aquiline

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English[edit]

Aquiline

Etymology[edit]

From Latin aquilīnus, from aquila(eagle)

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

aquiline ‎(comparative more aquiline, superlative most aquiline)

  1. of, pertaining to, or characteristic of eagles; resembling that of an eagle.
    • 1748, Tobias Smollett, The Adventures of Roderick Random, Chapter 22, [1]
      He was about the age of two-and-twenty, among the tallest of the middle size; had chestnut-coloured hair, which he wore tied up in a ribbon; a high polished forehead, a nose inclining to the aquiline, lively blue eyes, red pouting lips, teeth as white as snow, and a certain openness of countenance—but why need I describe any more particulars of his person?
    • 1791, Edmund Burke, Appeal from the New to the Old Whigs, London: J. Dodsley, pp. 139-140, [2]
      Think of a genius not born in every country or every time: a man gifted by Nature with a penetrating, aquiline eye; with a judgment prepared with the most extensive erudition; with an herculean robustness of mind, and nerves not to be broken with labour; a man who could spend twenty years in one pursuit.
    • 1903, Arthur Conan Doyle, “The Adventure of the Empty House,” in The Return of Sherlock Holmes, [3]
      Holmes looked even thinner and keener than of old, but there was a dead-white tinge in his aquiline face which told me that his life recently had not been a healthy one.
    • 2004, Alan Hollinghurst, The Line of Beauty, Bloomsbury, 2005, Chapter 11 (iii),
      [] Wani, whose smooth sleekness had been part of his charm, seemed to Nick to grow leaner and ever more aquiline.
    Frank's aquiline nose jutted out from underneath his glasses.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]


French[edit]

Adjective[edit]

aquiline

  1. feminine singular of aquilin

Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

aquiline

  1. feminine plural of aquilino

Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

aquilīne

  1. vocative masculine singular of aquilīnus