arán

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Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

ara (bride, literary) +‎ -n (case suffix)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

arán

  1. superessive singular of ara

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish arán,[1] from Proto-Celtic *aragnos, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂erh₃-ǵnh₁-os (literally born of the plough).[2]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

arán m (genitive singular aráin)

  1. bread
    • 1899, Franz Nikolaus Finck, Die araner mundart, volume II (overall work in German), Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, page 99:
      tȧńīn̄ n̥ t-rān šə lm̥ gə rī wōr.
      [Taitníonn an t-arán seo liom go rí-mhór.]
      I like this bread very much.

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
arán n-arán harán t-arán
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  1. ^ G. Toner, M. Ní Mhaonaigh, S. Arbuthnot, D. Wodtko, M.-L. Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “arán”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  2. ^ Hamp, Eric P. (1995), “Old Irish arbar n. “corn””, in Études Celtiques, volume 31, →DOI, pages 89–90
  3. ^ Sjoestedt, M. L. (1931) Phonétique d’un parler irlandais de Kerry (in French), Paris: Librairie Ernest Leroux, page 59
  4. ^ Finck, F. N. (1899) Die araner mundart (in German), volume II, Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, page 99
  5. ^ Quiggin, E. C. (1906) A Dialect of Donegal, Cambridge University Press, page 88

Further reading[edit]

Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Derived by Eric Hamp from Proto-Celtic *aragnos, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂erh₃-ǵnh₁-os, from *h₂erh₃- (to plough) +‎ *ǵenh₁- (born), literally born of the plough.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

arán m

  1. (rare) bread
    Synonym: bairgen
  2. loaf of bread

Usage notes[edit]

The term is most abundantly found in a memoir about monastery life at Tallaght, and appears generally nowhere else. Elsewhere, bairgen serves as the general term for bread.

Inflection[edit]

Masculine o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative arán aránL aráinL
Vocative aráin aránL aránuH
Accusative aránN aránL aránuH
Genitive aráinL arán aránN
Dative aránL aránaib aránaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle Irish: arán

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
arán unchanged n-arán
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hamp, Eric P. (1995), “Old Irish arbar n. “corn””, in Etudes Celtiques (in English), volume 31, issue 1, PERSEE Program, →DOI, →ISSN, pages 89–90

Further reading[edit]

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Basque aran (plum).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /aˈɾan/ [aˈɾãn]
  • Rhymes: -an
  • Syllabification: a‧rán

Noun[edit]

arán m (plural aranes)

  1. (regional, Biscay, Álava) blackthorn
    Synonyms: arañón, endrino

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]