attic

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See also: Attic

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the practice of decorating the top storey of building façades in the Attic architectural style. From French attique, from Latin atticus, from Ancient Greek Ἀττικός (Attikós).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈætɪk/, [ˈæɾɪk]
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ætɪk

Noun[edit]

attic (plural attics)

  1. The space, often unfinished and with sloped walls, directly below the roof in the uppermost part of a house or other building, generally used for storage or habitation.
    We went up to the attic to look for the boxes containing our childhood keepsakes.
  2. (slang) A person's head or brain.
    Synonym: upper storey
    • 1875, John Wight, Mornings at Bow Street (page 105)
      [] was a diminutive, forked-radish sort of a young man, very fashionably attired, or, as he would say, kiddily togg'd; and, though it was scarcely noon, he was rather queer in the attic; that is to say, not exactly sober.

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