brouhaha

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French brouhaha, but disputed as to where from before that. Possibly from Hebrew בָּרוּךְ הַבָּא(barúkh habá, welcome, literally blessed is he who comes).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈbɹuː.hɑː.hɑː/
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Noun[edit]

brouhaha (plural brouhahas)

  1. A stir; a fuss or uproar.
    Synonyms: commotion, hubbub, kerfuffle; see also Thesaurus:commotion
    It caused quite a brouhaha when the school suspended one of its top students for refusing to adhere to the dress code.
    • 1981, “Elephant Talk”, in Discipline, performed by King Crinsom:
      Talk, it's only talk / Babble, burble, banter / Bicker, bicker, bicker / Brouhaha, balderdash, ballyhoo / It's only talk / Back talk
    • 1999, “The Brouhaha”, in Hello Nasty, performed by Beastie Boys:
      What's all the fanfare, what's the to do / We're known to bring the hullabaloo / On stage or at the spa / Guaranteed we bring the brouhaha / ‘Cause it's a brouhaha

Translations[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Disputed. Possibly from an onomatopoeic assimilation from Hebrew בָּרוּךְ הַבָּא(barúkh habá, welcome, literally blessed is he who comes)

In regards to the semantic evolution to "noisy meeting" compare with ramdam, sabbat

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brouhaha m (plural brouhahas)

  1. brouhaha
    • 1865, Jules Verne, De la Terre à la Lune:
      Un brouhaha, une tempête d’exclamations accueillit ces paroles.
      A brouhaha, a gale of exclamations welcomed those words.

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