sabbat

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: Sabbat

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French sabbat ‎(Sabbath)

Noun[edit]

sabbat ‎(plural sabbats)

  1. witches' Sabbath

French[edit]

French Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia fr

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin sabbata or sabbatum, from Ancient Greek σάββατον ‎(sábbaton, Sabbath), from Hebrew שבת ‎(shabát, Sabbath).
In regards to the semantic evolution to "witches' meeting" compare with ramdam, brouhaha.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sabbat m ‎(plural sabbats)

  1. Sabbath, biblical seventh day
    Les juifs observent fort exactement le sabbat.
  2. witches' Sabbath, meeting of witches at midnight
    Qu’est-ce que vous portez donc là, mon petit fieu ? — Des crapauds qui t’ont vue au sabbat, vieille sorcière, répondit celui-ci. (Charles Deulin, Manneken-Pis)
  3. noisy meeting
    Ces ivrognes ont fait un terrible sabbat.

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]


Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sabbata, sabbatum, from Ancient Greek σάββατον ‎(sábbaton, Sabbath).

Noun[edit]

sabbat m (plural sabbats)

  1. (Jersey) witches' Sabbath

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Hebrew שבת ‎(shabát).

Noun[edit]

sabbat m ‎(definite singular sabbaten, indefinite plural sabbater, definite plural sabbatene)

  1. Sabbath, the Biblical seventh day of the week, observed as a day of rest in Judaism

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From Hebrew שבת ‎(shabát).

Noun[edit]

sabbat m ‎(definite singular sabbaten, indefinite plural sabbatar, definite plural sabbatane)

  1. Sabbath (as above)

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

sabbat m (plural sabbats)

  1. Alternative form of sabá

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

sabbat c

  1. Sabbath (Biblical seventh day of the week, observed in Judaism and by some Christians)
  2. Sabbath (Sunday, observed by the majority of Christians)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]