carruca

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English[edit]

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Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin carruca

Noun[edit]

carruca (plural carrucas)

  1. (historical) A heavy wheeled turnplow used during the Middle Ages.
    • 1912, Ralph Straus, Carriages & Coaches: Their History & Their Evolution, page 34:
      Pliny mentions another carriage of imperial Rome — the carruca, which had four wheels and was used equally in the city and for long journeys.

Hypernyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin carrūca.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /karˈru.ka/, [kär̺ˈr̺uːkä]
  • Stress: carrùca
  • Hyphenation: car‧ru‧ca

Noun[edit]

carruca f (plural carruche)

  1. (obsolete) coach, carriage

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

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Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From carrus, probably from Transalpine Gaulish.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

carrūca f (genitive carrūcae); first declension

  1. A chariot.
  2. A coach.
  3. (Medieval Latin) A heavy wheeled plow.

Inflection[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative carrūca carrūcae
genitive carrūcae carrūcārum
dative carrūcae carrūcīs
accusative carrūcam carrūcās
ablative carrūcā carrūcīs
vocative carrūca carrūcae

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • carruca in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “carruca”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • carruca” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • carruca in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • carruca in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly
  • carruca in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  • Western Civilization, Jackson J. Spielvogal, volume 1, To 1715
  • (etymology) The Breeches Bible: Considered as the Basis for Remarks, James Gurnhill (1862), page 25