clink

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See also: Clink

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /klɪŋk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋk

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English clinken, from Old English *clincan (compare clynnan, clynian (to sound; resound)), from Proto-Germanic *klinganą (to sound), perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *glengʰ- (to sound), from Proto-Indo-European *gal(o)s-, *glōs-, *golH-so- (voice, cry), related to call. Cognates include Middle Dutch klinken and German klingen.

Perhaps of onomatopoeic origin, as metal against metal.

Noun[edit]

clink (plural clinks)

Examples
(file)
  1. (onomatopoeia) The sound of metal on metal, or glass on glass.
    You could hear the clink of the glasses from the next room.
    • 1874, Marcus Clarke, For the Term of His Natural Life Chapter V
      When Frere had come down, an hour before, the prisoners were all snugly between their blankets. They were not so now; though, at the first clink of the bolts, they would be back again in their old positions, to all appearances sound asleep.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

clink (third-person singular simple present clinks, present participle clinking, simple past and past participle clinked)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To make a clinking sound; to make a sound of metal on metal or glass on glass; to strike materials such as metal or glass against one another.
    The hammers clinked on the stone all night.
    • Tennyson
      the clinking latch
  2. (humorous, dated) To rhyme.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From the Clink prison in Southwark, London, itself presumably named after sound of doors being bolted or chains rattling.

Noun[edit]

clink (plural clinks)

  1. (slang) A prison.
    If he keeps doing things like that, he’s sure to end up in the clink.
  2. Stress cracks produced in metal ingots as they cool after being cast.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]