cochlea

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin cochlea (a snail), from Ancient Greek κόχλιας (kókhlias, a snail with a spiral shell).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cochlea (plural cochleae or cochleas)

  1. (anatomy) The complex, spirally coiled, tapered cavity of the inner ear of higher vertebrates, which contains the organ of Corti and in which sound vibrations are converted into nerve impulses.
  2. A spiral-shaped shell, especially that of a snail.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek κοχλῐ́ᾱς (kokhlíās, snail with a spiral shell).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cochlea f (genitive cochleae); first declension

  1. snail
    in cochleamsnail-shaped, in the shape of a spiral
    1. snailshell
  2. (metonymically)
    1. spiral (form of a snailshell)
    2. screw of a press
    3. Archimedes' screw, water screw, screw pump (machine for drawing water by raising it)
    4. A kind of revolving door.
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Inflection[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative cochlea cochleae
Genitive cochleae cochleārum
Dative cochleae cochleīs
Accusative cochleam cochleās
Ablative cochleā cochleīs
Vocative cochlea cochleae

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • cochlea in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • cochlea in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cochlea in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • cochlea in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cochlea in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin