collusion

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Dated from the 14th century C.E. as Middle English collusioun, collusion; from Old French collusion, from Latin collusionem (act of colluding).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kəˈluːʒən/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

collusion (countable and uncountable, plural collusions)

  1. A secret agreement for an illegal purpose; conspiracy.
    • c. 1515–1516, published 1568, John Skelton, Againſt venemous tongues enpoyſoned with ſclaunder and falſe detractions &c.:
      Such tunges unhappy hath made great diviſion
      In realmes, in cities, by ſuche fals abuſion;
      Of fals fickil tunges ſuche cloked colluſion
      Hath brought nobil princes to extreme confuſion.
    • 2013 June 7, Gary Younge, “Hypocrisy lies at heart of Manning prosecution”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 188, number 26, page 18:
      The dispatches [] also exposed the blatant discrepancy between the west's professed values and actual foreign policies. Having lectured the Arab world about democracy for years, its collusion in suppressing freedom was undeniable as protesters were met by weaponry and tear gas made in the west, employed by a military trained by westerners.
    • 2021 March 25, Koichi Nakano, “The Olympics Are On! But Why?”, in The New York Times[1], ISSN 0362-4331:
      So why is Japan going ahead with the Olympics, against the public’s objections, while the pandemic is still a major public health concern? The answer is familiar: collusion among the elites.

Related terms[edit]

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French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

collusion f (plural collusions)

  1. collusion

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

collusion

  1. Alternative form of collusioun