conciliate

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin conciliātus, perfect passive participle of conciliō (I unite), from concilium (council, meeting).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˌkənˈsɪlieɪt/
  • (file)

Verb[edit]

conciliate (third-person singular simple present conciliates, present participle conciliating, simple past and past participle conciliated)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To acquire, to procure.
  2. (transitive, now rare) To reconcile (discordant theories, demands etc.); to make compatible, bring together.
    • 1792, Charlotte Smith, Desmond, Broadview 2001, p. 324:
      It must surely then happen, to a much greater degree, in a great nation, whose government is suddenly dissolved by the resolution of the people; and which, in taking a new form, has so many jarring interests to conciliate [] .
  3. (transitive) To make calm and content, or regain the goodwill of; to placate.
    • 1887, H. Rider Haggard, She: A History of Adventure[1]:
      `Surely, my father,' I answered courteously, feeling certain that I should do well to conciliate this ancient Mammon of Unrighteousness.
  4. (intransitive) To mediate in a dispute.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Verb[edit]

conciliate

  1. inflection of conciliare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person plural imperative

Etymology 2[edit]

Participle[edit]

conciliate f pl

  1. feminine plural of conciliato

Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

conciliāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of conciliō