consuetude

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See also: consuétude

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

PIE word
*ḱóm
PIE word
*swé

From Middle English consuetude, from Middle French consuetude, from Old French consuetude, learnedly borrowed from Latin cōnsuētūdō (custom), from cōnsuēscō (accustom, habituate; accustom oneself), corresponding to con- (with) + suēscō (become accustomed to). First element con- derives from cum, from Old Latin com, from Proto-Italic *kom, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱóm (with, along). Second element suēscō is from Proto-Indo-European *swe-dʰh₁-sk-, from *swé (self) + *dʰeh₁- (to put, place, set); related to Latin suus (one's own, his own). Doublet of custom, costume.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

consuetude (countable and uncountable, plural consuetudes)

  1. Custom, familiarity.
    • 1819, Walter Scott, Ivanhoe
      “the stain hath become engrained by time and consuetude; let thy reformation be cautious, as it is just and wise.”

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

PIE word
*ḱóm
PIE word
*swé

Learned borrowing from Latin cōnsuētūdō (custom), whence also coustume, costume. From cōnsuēscō (accustom, habituate), from con- (with) + suēscō (become used or accustomed to). First element con- derives from cum, from Old Latin com, from Proto-Italic *kom, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱóm (with, along). Second element suēscō is from Proto-Indo-European *swe-dʰh₁-sk-, from *swé (self) + *dʰeh₁- (to put, place, set); related to Latin suus (one's own, his own).

Noun[edit]

consuetude f (oblique plural consuetudes, nominative singular consuetude, nominative plural consuetudes)

  1. custom