correus

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See also: Correus

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

First attested in the singular in 1656 and in the plural in 1707; elliptical use from correus debendi.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

correus (plural correi)

  1. = correus debendi
    • 1656 June 7, John Thurloe (author) and Thomas Birch (editor), “A letter of intelligence from the Hague, 7 June 1656” in A Collection of the State Papers of John Thurloe V (London, 1742), page 71
      When a creditor will accept ſolutionem particularum vel correi, the debtor or the correus muſt pay
    • 1707 December 17, Sir John Lauder of Fountainhall (editor), The Deciſions of the Lords of Council and Seſſion, from June 6th, 1678, to July 30th, 1712 II (Edinburgh, 1761), page 404
      Since this act, few take bonds with cautioners, but bind them all as correi and principals.

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Noun[edit]

correus

  1. plural of correu

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

cor- (joint) +‎ reus (accused”, “defendant)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

correus m (genitive correī); second declension

  1. a partaker in guilt, a joint criminal

Inflection[edit]

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative correus correī
genitive correī correōrum
dative correō correīs
accusative correum correōs
ablative correō correīs
vocative corree correī

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • correus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “correus”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • correus” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • correus in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • correus in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray
  • correus in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin