culver

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See also: Culver

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkʌlvə/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌlvə

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English culver, from Old English culufre, culfre, culfer, possibly borrowed from Vulgar Latin *columbra, from Latin columbula (little pigeon), from Latin columba (pigeon, dove).

Noun[edit]

culver (plural culvers)

  1. (now UK, south and east dialect or poetic) A dove or pigeon, now specifically of the species Columba palumbus.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From culverin.

Noun[edit]

culver (plural culvers)

  1. A culverin, a kind of handgun or cannon.
Translations[edit]

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English culufre, culfre, culfer, borrowed from Vulgar Latin *columbra, from Latin columbula.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

culver (plural culveres or culveren)

  1. A dove (Columba spp.)
    • c. 1395, John Wycliffe, John Purvey [et al.], transl., Bible (Wycliffite Bible (later version), MS Lich 10.)‎[1], published c. 1410, Joon 2:16, page 45r, column 2; republished as Wycliffe's translation of the New Testament, Lichfield: Bill Endres, 2010:
      And he ſeide to hem þat ſelden culueris / take ȝe awei from hennes þeſe þingis .· ⁊ nyle ȝe make þe hous of my fadir an hows of marchaundiſe
      And he said to those who sold doves: "Take those things out of here; you won't make my father's house a place of business!"
  2. An affectionate term of familiarity.

Synonyms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: culver

References[edit]