curate

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Medieval Latin cūrātus, from Latin cūrō. Doublet of curato and curé.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

curate (plural curates)

  1. An assistant rector or vicar.
  2. A parish priest.
  3. (Ireland) An assistant barman.
    • 1914 June, James Joyce, “Counterparts”, in Dubliners, London: Grant Richards, OCLC 1170255194, page 107:
      “Here, Pat, give us a g.p., like a good fellow.” The curate brought him a glass of plain porter. The man drank it at a gulp and asked for a caraway seed. He put his penny on the counter and, leaving the curate to grope for it in the gloom, retreated out of the snug as furtively as he had entered it.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

Back-formation from curator.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

curate (third-person singular simple present curates, present participle curating, simple past and past participle curated)

  1. (transitive) To act as a curator for.
    She curated the traveling exhibition.
    They carefully curated the recovered artifacts.
  2. (by extension, transitive) To apply selectivity and taste to, as a collection of fashion items or web pages.
    • 2007 May 16, “TV Networks Woo Advertisers with Fall Line-Up”, in NPR_TalkNation:
      What I love about DVRs is that they really allow you to curate your experience of television.
    • 2010 May, David Biespiel, “This Land Is Our Land”, in Poetry, volume 196, number 2, page 151-158:
      During the past five years I had the good fortune to be editor of Poetry Northwest. The magazine's mission includes curating a dialogue between poetry, the other arts, and civic life.
    • 2010 November 28, Laura Compton, “Shopping sites redefine fashion”, in San Francisco Chronicle, Style, page G1:
      To grasp how this all works, think of the concepts of editing and curating, adopted from publishing and art but now used constantly in the fashion world to imply judgment, taste and discernment.
    • 2011 February, Seth Porges, “Digital Clinic”, in Popular Mechanics, volume 188, number 2, page 105:
      From there, click the Notifications tab and scroll down to Groups. This will bring up a page that allows you to curate what sort of Group-related activity results in e-mail alerts.
    • 2012 June 10, “TechBits: Fab lets you shop, if not sort”, in Washington Post:
      Sometimes, you just want to shop for the pure joy of looking at cool things. And the app for Fab, a curated shopping site, is just the place to do that.
    • 2014, Astra Taylor, chapter 3, in The People's Platform: Taking Back Power and Culture in the Digital Age, Henry Holt and Company, →ISBN:
      The line between reporter and reader will blur as a growing number of people create, curate, and circulate content.
    • 2015 April 18, David Balzer, “‘Reading lists, outfits, even salads are curated – it’s absurd’”, in The Guardian[1]:
      Contemporary curating has become an absurdity. Outfits are curated. Salads are curated. Twitter feeds are curated. Bennington College in Vermont invites prospective students to curate their applications.
  3. (intransitive) To work or act as a curator.
    Not only does he curate for the museum, he manages the office and fund-raises.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

cur(ium) +‎ -ate

Noun[edit]

curate (plural curates)

  1. (inorganic chemistry) An oxyanion of curium; any salt containing such an anion.

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Verb[edit]

curate

  1. inflection of curare:
    1. second-person plural present
    2. second-person plural imperative

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

cūrāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of cūrō

References[edit]

  • curate”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • curate in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette