desiderate

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin, from the participle stem of the verb dēsīderāre (to desire).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

desiderate (third-person singular simple present desiderates, present participle desiderating, simple past and past participle desiderated)

  1. (transitive) To miss; to feel the absence of; to long for.
    • 1879, William Hurrell Mallock, Is Life Worth Living?
      Between our human nature and the nature they desiderate there is a deep and fordless river, over which they can throw no bridge, and all their talk supposes that we shall be able to fly or wade across it []
    • 1922, James Joyce, Ulysses:
      it put him in thought of that missing link of creation’s chain desiderated by the late ingenious Mr Darwin.

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

desiderate (comparative more desiderate, superlative most desiderate)

  1. desired, wished or longed for
    • 1916, Lord Dunsany, “A Tale of London” in Tales of Wonder:
      O Friend of God, know then that London is the desiderate town even of all Earth's cities.

Italian[edit]

Verb[edit]

desiderate f pl

  1. feminine plural of desiderato

Adjective[edit]

desiderate f pl

  1. feminine plural of desiderato

Verb[edit]

desiderate

  1. second-person plural present indicative of desiderare
  2. second-person plural present subjunctive of desiderare
  3. second-person plural imperative of desiderare

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

dēsīderāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of dēsīderō

Participle[edit]

dēsīderāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of dēsīderātus

References[edit]