diapason

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See also: diapasón

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin diapason, from Ancient Greek διαπασῶν (diapasôn), that is διά (diá) + πασῶν (pasôn) (χορδῶν (khordôn)) ‘through all (notes)’.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

diapason (plural diapasons)

  1. the range or scope of something, especially of notes in a scale, or of a particular musical instrument
    • 1934: the piano curving like a conch, corollas giving out diapasons of light — Henry Miller, Tropic of Cancer
    • 1961: he could hear nothing except the rattle of the crickets and the swelling diapason of the frogs — Graham Greene, A Burnt-Out Case
  2. the musical octave

Translations[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin diapason, from Ancient Greek διαπασων (diapasōn), that is διά (diá) + πασων (pasōn) (χορδων (khordōn)) ‘through all (notes)’.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

diapason m (countable and uncountable, plural diapasons)

  1. (music, uncountable) range, diapason
  2. (countable) a tuning fork

Further reading[edit]