encombrer

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French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French encombrer, from Old French encombrer (to hinder, burden, encumber), from Medieval Latin incombrō (to hinder, inconvenience, burden), from Medieval Latin combrus (barricade of felled trees), possibly from Gaulish *komberū, from Proto-Celtic *kombereti (to bring together) (compare Old Irish conbeir (brings together, bears)), from *kom- +‎ *bereti (to bear), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰéreti (to be carrying).[1][2] Alternatively from Latin cumulus (heap, pile), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱewh₁- (to swell).[3]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

encombrer

  1. (transitive) to block off, to clutter, to clutter up, to congest
  2. (transitive) to encumber, to burden
  3. (transitive) to jam (e.g. a switchboard)

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Niermeyer, Jan Frederik (1976), “combrus”, in Mediae Latinitatis Lexicon Minus (in Latin), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 204
  2. ^ encombrer” in le Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).
  3. ^ encombre” in An etymological dictionary of the French language, Oxford University Press, 1837.

Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From combre, more at encombrer.

Verb[edit]

encombrer

  1. to bother; to irritate; to annoy
  2. to burden

Conjugation[edit]

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. In the present tense an extra supporting e is needed in the first-person singular indicative and throughout the singular subjunctive, and the third-person singular subjunctive ending -t is lost. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]