formica

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See also: Formica and fórmica

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

A genericization of the trademark Formica, which see.

Noun[edit]

formica (countable and uncountable, plural formicas)

  1. A heat-resistant laminate material used to veneer countertops.

Synonyms[edit]

Hyponyms[edit]

  • Formica (the trademarked brand name material)
  • Arborite (the trademarked brand name material)

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Noun[edit]

formica m (plural formicas)

  1. formica

Italian[edit]

Due formiche – Two ants

Etymology 1[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

From Latin formīca, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *morwi. Cognates include Ancient Greek μύρμηξ (múrmēx).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /forˈmi.ka/
  • Rhymes: -ika
  • Hyphenation: for‧mì‧ca

Noun[edit]

formica f (plural formiche)

  1. ant
    Synonym: formicola
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From English Formica.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

formica f (plural formiche)

  1. Formica (a plastic laminated material)

Etymology 3[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

formica

  1. feminine singular of formico

Further reading[edit]

  • formica in Collins Italian-English Dictionary
  • formica in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)
  • formica in garzantilinguistica.it – Garzanti Linguistica, De Agostini Scuola Spa
  • formica in Dizionario Italiano Olivetti, Olivetti Media Communication
  • formica in sapere.it – De Agostini Editore
  • formica in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Latin Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia la

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *mormīkā, from Proto-Indo-European *morwi (a term with many deviating forms, probably taboo distortions, in various Indo-European languages). The irregular change of m- to f- can be explained by dissimilation of m- -m- to f- -m-.[1] Cognate with Sanskrit वम्र (vamra), Ancient Greek μύρμηξ (múrmēx), Old Church Slavonic мравии (mravii), Polish mrówka, Old Irish moirb, Welsh myrion, Old Norse maurr, English mire, Albanian morr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

formīca f (genitive formīcae); first declension

  1. ant
    • 405 CE, Jerome, Vulgate Proverbs.6.6:
      vāde ad formīcam ō piger et cōnsīderā viās eius et disce sapientiam
      Go to the ant, O sluggard, and consider her ways, and learn wisdom (Douay-Rheims trans., Challoner rev.; 1752 CE)

Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative formīca formīcae
Genitive formīcae formīcārum
Dative formīcae formīcīs
Accusative formīcam formīcās
Ablative formīcā formīcīs
Vocative formīca formīcae

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • formica”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • formica”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • formica in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • formica in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 234