fuath

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Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish fúath, úath ‎(likeness, form, semblance; a hideous or supernatural form, a spectre, apparition, monster).

Noun[edit]

fuath m ‎(genitive singular fuatha, nominative plural fuathanna or fuatha)

  1. (literary) form, shape
  2. phantom, spectre
Declension[edit]
Alternative declension

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Irish fúath ‎(hatred, abhorrence), from Old Irish úath ‎(horror).

Noun[edit]

fuath m ‎(genitive singular fuatha)

  1. hate, hatred (with do or ar + the person or thing hated)
    fuath agam don áit sin.
    I hate that place.
    fuath agam ar an áit sin.
    I hate that place.
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
fuath fhuath bhfuath
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • "fuath" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • 1 fúath” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.
  • 1 úath” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Irish fúath ‎(hatred, abhorrence), from Old Irish úath ‎(horror).

Noun[edit]

fuath m ‎(genitive singular fuatha, plural fuathan)

  1. antipathy, hate, hatred
  2. abhorrence, loathing
  3. enmity, odium

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Faclair Gàidhlig Dwelly Air Loidhne, Dwelly, Edward (1911), Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic-English Dictionary (10th ed.), Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, ISBN 0 901771 92 9
  • 2 fúath” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.
  • 1 úath” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.