gaiter

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See also: Gaiter

English[edit]

hiking gaiters (2)

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from French guêtre, from Middle French guiestres, guestes pl, from Old French *gueste, from Frankish *wasta, *wastija, from Proto-Germanic *wastijō (garment; dress).

Cognate with Middle High German wester (a child's chrisom-cloth), Middle High German westebarn (godchild), Old English wæstling (a coverlet), Gothic 𐍅𐌰𐍃𐍄𐌹 (wasti, garment; dress).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gaiter (plural gaiters)

  1. A covering of cloth or leather for the ankle and instep.
    Coordinate term: spats
  2. A covering cloth or leather for the whole leg from the knee to the instep, fitting down upon the shoe.
  3. Part of the ecclesiastical garb of a bishop.
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

gaiter (third-person singular simple present gaiters, present participle gaitering, simple past and past participle gaitered)

  1. To dress with gaiters.

Further reading[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English gaytre, from Old English gāte-trēow (the common dogwood), equivalent to gāt (goat) +‎ trēow (tree).

Noun[edit]

gaiter (plural gaiters)

  1. (obsolete, dialectal) The dogwood, or a similar shrub.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

gaita +‎ -er

Noun[edit]

gaiter m (plural gaiters, feminine gaitera)

  1. bagpiper

Further reading[edit]


Old French[edit]

Verb[edit]

gaiter

  1. Alternative form of gaitier

Conjugation[edit]

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The forms that would normally end in *-ts, *-tt are modified to z, t. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.