gog

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Gog and gőg

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Likely from agog; it appeared first as on gog. Attested from the 16th to 18th centuries. Compare French gogue (sprightliness), and Welsh gogi (to agitate, shake).

Noun[edit]

gog (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete) Haste; ardent desire to go.
    1812 [1639], John Fletcher, “Wit Without Money”, in The Works of Beaumont and Fletcher[1], page 65:
    Nay, you have put me into such a gog of going,
    I would not stay for all the world.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Amanab[edit]

Noun[edit]

gog

  1. tooth

Irish[edit]

Noun[edit]

gog m (genitive singular goig, nominative plural goga)

  1. a nod
  2. syllable

Northern Kurdish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *gog- (round), cognate with English cake.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gog f

  1. ball

Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gog

  1. Soft mutation of cog (cuckoo).

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
cog gog nghog chog
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.