hôtel

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See also: hotel, Hotel, hotèl, hótel, and hoṭél

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from the same source as hotel is, French hôtel, but this form keeps the circumflex.

Noun[edit]

hôtel (plural hôtels)

  1. Archaic spelling of hotel.
    • 1840, Knight, Charles, The Penny Magazine of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge, volume 9, page 204:
      The residences of some of the nobility in London were at one period called Inns, which has the same signification as hôtel, and several of the Inns of Court, as Gray’s Inn, Furnival’s Inn, Lincoln’s Inn, and Clifford’s Inn, were originally the residences of Lords Gray, Furnival, Lincoln, and Clifford. [] Many of the hôtels in Paris contain within their enclosed walls an extensive garden, spacious court, stables, and offices.
    • 1840, Audin, Jean-Marie-Vincent, The Traveller’s Classical Guide Through France:
      The price is high in the large and elegant hôtels in the opulent quarters; but more moderate rate in those situated in the interior of the city, where lodgings are simply neat and convenient. The hôtels the most splendid and expensive, are those of the quarters of Palais Royal, Tuileries and Chaussée-d’Antin. [] All these prices include the portage from the hôtel to, and from packet-boat to the hôtel. [] Among the many old Hôtels, the traveller, will notice: the hôtel of the Bouvardière; the hôtel of Drouges, and the episcopal palace.
    • 1871, Chambers, William; Chambers, Robert, “HÔTEL”, in Chambers's Encyclopaedia: A Dictionary of Universal Knowledge for the People, volume 5, page 437:
      In point of fact, the garçon is much above the English waiter in his aims. He voluntarily undergoes a kind of curriculum of education, by passing from the hôtels of one country to those of another, and does not consider himself proficient till he speaks German, French, Italian, and English; at the very least, if of German birth, speaking French with fluency. Some good and capacious hôtels, built distinctly as such, have lately been established at the principal railway termini in London, also at Dover and a few other places. With these exceptions, the hôtels of England are far behind the new high-class hôtels of the continent; nor do we know of any English hôtel which approaches in grandeur or extent to the Hôtel de Louvre in Paris, the Metropole at Geneva, or to some of the magnificent hôtels at Hamburg. But while we now write (1862), projects are on foot to build several hôtels in London worthy of the place, and corresponding to the vastness of modern demands. / In England, the hôtel system of living is simply that of paying for what is called for, with the addition of a certain charge per diem for the rooms which are occupied; in France and other continental countries, this plan is so far modified by the plan of dining at a table d’hôte, which lessens the general expenses. Both in England and continental hôtels, the charge for attendance is now made explicitly in the bill, a very grateful improvement. The ordinary hôtels in all parts of the United Kingdom are licensed by magistrates to sell wines, spirits, and other excisable liquors, and therefore come under the category of public-houses open to the supervision of the police. In the higher-class hôtels, however, the supply of liquors is confined to the resident guests; and it is only in the others that drink is sold as in taverns. [] Throughout the United States of America, the system of hôtels has taken a peculiar turn. The hôtels are built for the purpose, and usually very large; with few exceptions they are conducted as boarding-houses on the plan of charging so much per diem, everything included excepting liquor, which is obtainable in a large drinking-room called the bar. [] Elegant in their architecture, and spacious and commodious in their interior arrangements, the American hôtels are got up at great expense, as may be judged from their extensive accommodation, which ranges from 180 to 800 rooms. [] The system of American hôtels is generally followed in the British colonies.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French hostel from Old French ostel; inherited from Late Latin hospitālis, hospitāle (hospice, shelter, guesthouse), noun use of Latin hospitālis (hospitable; pertaining to a host or guest). Doublet of hôpital.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hôtel m (plural hôtels)

  1. mansion, town house, hotel
    • 1862, Victor Hugo, Les Misérables, I.1.ii:
      Le palais épiscopal était un vaste et bel hôtel bâti en pierre au commencement du siècle dernier par monseigneur Henri Puget [...].
      The Bishops' Palace was a vast and beautiful building built of stone at the beginning of the last century by M. Henri Puget.
  2. hotel

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Either inherited from Old French hostel or borrowed from French hôtel.

Noun[edit]

hôtel m (plural hôtels)

  1. hotel