hove

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See also: Hove and ho ve

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English hoven (to linger, wait, hover, move aside, entertain, cherish, foster), from Old English *hofian (to receive into one's house), from Proto-Germanic *hufōną (to house, lodge), from Proto-Germanic *hufą (hill, height, farm, dwelling), from Proto-Indo-European *keup- (to arch, bend, buckle). Cognate with Old Frisian hovia (to receive into one's home, entertain), Old Dutch hoven (to receive into one's home, entertain). Related to Old English hof (court, house, dwelling). More at hovel.

Verb[edit]

hove (third-person singular simple present hoves, present participle hoving, simple past and past participle hoved)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To remain suspended in air, water etc.; to float, to hover.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.7:
      As shee arrived on the roring shore, / In minde to leape into the mighty maine, / A little bote lay hoving her before [].
  2. (obsolete, intransitive) To wait, linger.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, chapter X, in Le Morte Darthur, book XVIII:
      Alle these xv knyghtes were knyghtes of the table round / Soo these with moo other came in to gyders / and bete on bak the kynge of Northumberland and the kynge of Northwalys / whan sir launcelot sawe this as he houed in a lytil leued woode / thenne he sayd vnto syre lauayn / see yonder is a company of good knyghtes
  3. (obsolete, intransitive) To move on or by.
  4. (intransitive, now chiefly dialectal) To remain; delay.
  5. (intransitive, now chiefly dialectal) To remain stationary (usually on horseback).
Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English hoven, alteration (due to hove, hoven, past tense and past participle of heven (to heave)). More at heave.

Verb[edit]

hove (third-person singular simple present hoves, present participle hoving, simple past and past participle hoved)

  1. (transitive, now chiefly dialectal) To raise; lift; hold up.
  2. (intransitive, now chiefly dialectal) To rise.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, I.ii:
      Astond he stood, and vp his haire did houe, / And with that suddein horror could no member moue.

Etymology 3[edit]

Inflected forms.

Verb[edit]

hove

  1. (nautical) simple past tense and past participle of heave
  2. (obsolete or dialectal) simple past tense and past participle of heave
Synonyms[edit]

Middle Dutch[edit]

Noun[edit]

hōve

  1. inflection of hof:
    1. dative singular
    2. nominative/accusative/genitive plural

Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English hōfe.

Noun[edit]

hōve (uncountable)

  1. ground-ivy

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Verb[edit]

hove

  1. supine of hevja

Participle[edit]

hove

  1. neuter of hoven

Adjective[edit]

hove

  1. neuter of hoven

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

hove n (definite singular hovet, indefinite plural hove, definite plural hova)

  1. (dialectal) alternative form of hovud (head)
    • 1974, Horvei, Knut, Gann, [Oslo]: Noregs boklag, page 91:
      Berre ikkje Kreksen vart eit hove kortare [...]
      Lest Kreksen became a head shorter.

Old Frisian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hove

  1. dative singular of hof

References[edit]

  • Bremmer, Rolf H. (2009) An Introduction to Old Frisian: History, Grammar, Reader, Glossary, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, →ISBN