immutable

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English immutable, from Latin immūtābilis (unchangeable); im- +‎ mutable

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

immutable (not comparable)

  1. unable to be changed without exception.
    The government has enacted an immutable law.
    • 1834, Letitia Elizabeth Landon, Francesca Carrara, volume 2, page 171:
      Mutable as is our nature, it delights in the immutable: and we expect as much constancy as if all time, to say nothing of our own changeableness, had not shewn that ever "the fashion of this world passeth away."
  2. (programming, of a variable) not able to be altered in the memory after its value is set initially.
    Constants are immutable.

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

immutable (plural immutables)

  1. something that cannot be changed

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

immutable (plural immutables)

  1. immutable
  2. (programming) immutable

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin immutabilis; equivalent to in- +‎ mutable.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /i(n)ˌmiu̯ˈtaːbəl/, /i(n)ˌmiu̯ˈtaːblə/

Adjective[edit]

immutable (Late Middle English)

  1. immutable, unchangeable

Descendants[edit]

  • English: immutable

References[edit]