insulse

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin insulsus; prefix in- not + salsus salted, from salire, salsum, to salt.

Adjective[edit]

insulse (comparative more insulse, superlative most insulse)

  1. (obsolete) insipid; dull; stupid
    • 1642, John Milton, An Apology for Smectymnuus; republished in A Complete Collection of the Historical, Political, and Miscellaneous Works of John Milton, [], volume I, Amsterdam [actually London: s.n.], 1698, OCLC 926209975, page 172:
      [] will ever appeare among the judicious to be but an inſuls and frigid affectation.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for insulse in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

insulse

  1. feminine plural of insulso

Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

īnsulse

  1. vocative masculine singular of īnsulsus

References[edit]

  • insulse in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • insulse in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • insulse in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette