jark

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

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Noun[edit]

jark (plural jarks)

  1. A seal (stamp or impression of a stamp).
    • 1818, Walter Scott, chapter XXIX, in The Heart of Midlothian (The Waverley Novels)‎[1], volume 2, page 92:
      "This is a jark from Jim Ratcliffe," said the taller, having looked at the bit of paper.
Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

jark (third-person singular simple present jarks, present participle jarking, simple past and past participle jarked)

  1. (slang, military, Britain) To modify (weaponry) to disadvantage; especially, to attach and use a tracking device to covertly monitor its location.
    • 1996, Andy McNab, Immediate Action[2], page 365:
      At the end of the day, it was inevitable that the IRA would discover that its weapons were being jarked.
    • 2001, Peter Taylor, Brits:the War Against the IRA[3], page 255:
      'Anna' and 'Mary' were involved in operations that drew on a variety of intelligence data: ‘jarking’; information from agents; [] One of the weapons, perhaps the Armalite, had been ‘jarked’ by the ‘Det’ and tracked for some time.
    • 2010, Christopher C. Harmon, Andrew N. Pratt, Sebastian Gorka, Toward a Grand Strategy Against Terrorism[4], page 197:
      An especially creative method was known as “jarking,” which involved “the placing of tiny tracking devices on weapons in arms caches so their movements can be followed.”8
    • 2010, Ed Moloney, Voices from the Grave: Two Men's War in Ireland[5], page 282:
      The homes and safe houses he provided were bugged; the weapons hidden in empty houses were ‘jarked’ so the security forces could keep track of them, and the vehicles used to ferry weapons put under close surveillance.
Usage notes[edit]

(track weaponry): Both word and practice became common during the Ulster Troubles (1968-1998).

Etymology 2[edit]

From jerk.

Verb[edit]

jark (third-person singular simple present jarks, present participle jarking, simple past and past participle jarked)

  1. Eye dialect spelling of jerk.
    • 1996, William Gilmore Simms, Mary Ann Wimsatt, “Bald-Head Bill Bauldy”, in Tales of the South[6], page 323:
      First, I felt a kick in my side, and ribs; then I felt myself pulled and jarked about, by the arms and shoulders; and, when I opened my eyes and straightened myself out, to see what alligator hed got hold of me now, what should I see but a squad of four or five of our own Rigiment, all pulling at me at onst!

References[edit]

  • jarking, in The New Partridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English: J-Z, by Eric Partridge, Tom Dalzell, Terry Victor, Taylor & Francis, 2006. →ISBN, 9780415259385.
  • Toby Harnden, Bandit Country: The IRA & South Armagh, →ISBN

Ngandi[edit]

Noun[edit]

jark

  1. water

Descendants[edit]

  • → Dhuwal: gutjark (with the Ngandi noun class prefix gu-)

References[edit]

  • Colette G. Craig, Noun Classes and Categorization (1986, →ISBN, page 389