lackadaisical

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the archaic interjection lackaday, lackadaisy.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˌlækəˈdeɪzɪkəl/
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Adjective[edit]

lackadaisical (comparative more lackadaisical, superlative most lackadaisical)

  1. Showing no interest, vigor, determination, or enthusiasm.
    Synonyms: languid, listless, unenthusiastic, uninterested, lethargic
    • 1822, William Hazlitt, “On the Disadvantages of Intellectual Superiority”, in Table-Talk, volume II:
      I, at one time, used to go and take a hand at cribbage with a friend, and afterwards discuss a cold sirloin of beef, and throw out a few lackadaisical remarks, in a way to please myself, but it would not do long.
    • 1864, Anthony Trollope, chapter 58, in The Small House at Allington:
      "Then let those who do know it learn that you are able to bear such wounds without outward complaint. I tell you fairly that I cannot sympathize with a lackadaisical lover."
    • 2010, Clare Vanderpool, Moon Over Manifest:
      I could hear the sound of the janitor's lackadaisical scrubbing against the wooden floor.
    the lackadaisical look on his face
  2. Lazy; slothful; indolent.

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