maréchaussée

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See also: marechaussee

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French maréchaussée.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

maréchaussée (plural maréchaussées)

  1. (historical) A type of local guard force, especially in France, commanded by a marshal; loosely, the police, the constabulary.
    • 1789, George Washington, letter, 6 Feb 1780:
      I do not unite the Maréchaussée, because that corps is destined for a particular service, to which it will be altogether applied in the course of the next campaign, nor should I think it advisable to convert it to any other purpose.
    • 1850, Charles Augustus Murray, Miranda:
      ‘Malediction,’ he muttered to himself, but then, with that peculiar command over himself which rarely quitted him, he at once recovered, and moved towards the two officers of the maréchaussée, now semi-inebriated.
    • 2002, Colin Jones, The Great Nation, Penguin 2003, p. 156:
      Peasant communities were often effectively self-policing, while the newly reorganized maréchaussée served as an ancillary peace-keeping force.

French[edit]

French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

Etymology[edit]

Old French mareschaucie (marshalcy) (with change of suffix), see maréchal.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

maréchaussée f (plural maréchaussées)

  1. (historical) maréchaussée
  2. (humorous) constabulary

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]