mounture

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English mounture, from Old French mounteure; equivalent to mount +‎ -ure.

Noun[edit]

mounture (countable and uncountable, plural mountures)

  1. (obsolete) The angle at which a gun is raised for firing.
  2. (obsolete, astronomy) The angle of ascension.
    • 1735, William Ross, The New Astronomer, page 65:
      On the Ecliptick is added the'.Mounture of the Moon's Orb, which turns on the Ecliptick at ae in the Centre at N.
    • 1760, Biographia Britannica:
      He concludes with an account of several experiments he had lately made in the art of gunnery; upon which, in return to Flamstead's remark of his errors in the eclipse, he takes notice of a mistake made by that Astronomer, in a table of horizontal ranges, wherein a mounture of 42 degrees was put for the utmost random, which he conceived to be demonstrably 45 degrees.
  3. The part of a loom that holds the harnesses.
    • 1822, William Newton, The London journal of arts and sciences, page 50:
      This is an addition to Duffs draw-boy, and consists in the introduction of a balance weight upon the side of the shaft for the purpose of counterpoising the leads, and enabling the machine to operate with greater ease to the workman in raising a heavy mounture.
    • 1868, William Wood & Erastus Brigham Bigelow, Correspondence Relating to the Invention of the Jacquard Brussels Carpet, page 8:
      Therefore, in weaving certain fabrics, such, for example, as counterpanes, quiltings, and Jacquard Brussels carpets, the mounture was placed at a considerable distance back of the batten; and a poll shaft or leaf of heddles employed to raise the warps connected with the Jacquard harness for the passage of the shuttle, whilst the Jacquard harness remained at rest.
    • 1914, William S. Murphy, Modern drapery and allied trades, page 142:
      The loom for such work must be fitted with a double harness for small designs, and a compound mounture and harness or a shaft mounture for large ones.
  4. (obsolete) A part on any mechanical device that is used for mounting other parts.
    • 16th century, George Gascoigne, The Posies
      A peece as well renforst, as ever yet was wrought, The bravest peece for breech and bore, that ever yet was bought: The mounture so well made, and for my pitch so fit, As though I see faire peeces moe, yet fewe so fine as it: A peece which shot so well, so gently and so streight, It neyther bruzed with recule, nor wroong with overweight.
    • 1670, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, Volume 5:
      What the difference between the said mounture upon 4 such Segments, or upon 4 wheels moving distinctly upon their Axell trees, as also between 2 wheels or one Segment like a Cart, or wheele and 2 segments like a wheele-barrow.
    • 1876, Patents for inventions. Abridgments of specifications:
      Behind the hair is fixed a brass plate, which I call a bolster, because it stays the hair whilst it performs the work, and then the cane or chain is taken through all " the tackle, and fastened to a breast roll, and set to work " with double mounture of all sorts (videlicet) sixteen tumblers, sexteen lamms or countermeshes, and nine treadles.
  5. (obsolete) The act or process of mounting.
    • 1704, The Gentleman's Jockey, and Approved Farrier, page 77:
      This you shall do concerning his ordinary keeping at home, where the Horse hath rest, and that you may dispose of hours as you please; but if you be either in Travel, or Sport, or other occasion, so that you cannot observe these particular times, then you must divide the main and whole quantity of Meat into fewer parts and greater quantities, and give them at the best conveniency; ever observing to give the least quantity before Travel; as a third part before Mounture, and the two other after you come to rest.
    • 1854, Charles Bernard Gibson, The Last Earl of Desmond, page 55:
      It was then," as the modest knight says of himself, " the President shewed himselfe to bee a master in that facultie ; for cannonier or other artificer, skilful in the mounture of ordnance, he had none ;
    • 1887, John Bruce & William Douglas Hamilton, Calendar of State Papers: Domestic Series, of the Reign of Charles 1, 1625, page 280:
      The defect for the complete "mounture" of the Navy brass ordnance is 400 pieces; the Parliament in 1624 provided 500 iron ordnance with their carriages and other equipage for the mounture of 50 colliers to attend his Majesty's, fleet, which since have otherwise been disposed of, so that now none are remaining in the magazine for that service.
  6. A horse or other animal used for riding; a mount.
    • late 14th century, Anonymous, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
      After messe a morsel he and his men token; Miry was the mornyng, his mounture he askes. Alle the hatheles that on horse schulde helden hym afier Were boun, busked on hor blonkkes bifore the halle yates.
    • 1789, Joseph Sterling, Poems, page 226:
      No more the Tartar Prince shall vaunt his steed, Thy nobler mounture glory has enroll'd;
    • 1802, Jerusalem Delivered: An Heroic Poem - Volume 1, →ISBN, page 148:
      And forward spurred his mounture fierce withal, Within his arms longing his foe to strain, Upon whose helm the heavy blow did fall, And bent well-nigh the metal to his brain.
    • 1844, Torquato Tasso, Edward Fairfax, & Charles Knight, Godfrey of Bulloigne:
      An elephant this furious giant bore, He fierce as fire, his mounture swift as wind; Much people brought he from his kingdoms wide, 'Twixt Indus, Ganges, and the salt sea side.
    • 1902, Methodist Magazine and Review - Volume 55, page 215:
      First of the host A youthful chieftain, clad in pelt of pard, Whose mounture is a striped horse of the wilds Caparisoned in gold, rides nobly forth.
    • 1975, Great Britain Parliament House of Lords, Sessional Papers, page 392:
      Both Harness and every Species of Mounture, and every other preparatory Expence is made by the Master in Dublin.

References[edit]

  • Webster's Third New International Dictionary Unabridged

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Old French mounteure; equivalent to mounten +‎ -ure.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mounture

  1. (rare) A mount; a mounture.
  2. (rare) A podium or support for mounting.

Descendants[edit]

  • English: mounture

References[edit]