mucro

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin

Noun[edit]

mucro (plural mucros or mucrones)

  1. (botany, zoology) A pointed end, often sharp, abruptly terminating an organ, such as a projection at the tip of a leaf; the posterior tip of a cuttlebone; or the distal part of the furcula in Collembola.

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Perhaps individualizing n-stem derivative of a lost adjective *mūkro- "pointed, sharp", from a Proto-Italic *meuk-ro- or mouk-ro-, derivative of a Proto-Indo-European root *h₂meuk̂- also seen in Greek ἀμύσσω "I tear, rip" and ἀμυκάλαι "arrowtips" and perhaps also in Lithuanian mùšti "strike".

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mūcrō m (genitive mūcrōnis); third declension

  1. A sharp point, especially the point of a sword.
  2. (figuratively) A sword.
  3. A sharp edge.

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative mūcrō mūcrōnēs
Genitive mūcrōnis mūcrōnum
Dative mūcrōnī mūcrōnibus
Accusative mūcrōnem mūcrōnēs
Ablative mūcrōne mūcrōnibus
Vocative mūcrō mūcrōnēs

Descendants[edit]

  • Catalan: mugró
  • English: mucro
  • Portuguese: mucrão

References[edit]

  • mucro in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879
  • mucro in Charlton T. Lewis, An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers, 1891
  • mucro in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • mucro in Gaffiot, Félix, Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette, 1934
  • mucro in Harry Thurston Peck, editor, Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers, 1898