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From Latin nidor.



nidor ‎(plural nidor)

  1. The smell of burning animals, especially of burning animal fat.
    • 1743, Thomas Stackhouse, A Compleat Body of Speculative and Practical Divinity, edition 3 (London), page 524:
      The First-fruits were a common Oblation to their Deities; but the chief Part of their Worship consisted in sacrificiing Animals : And this they did out of a real Persuasion, that their Gods were pleased with their Blood, and were nourished with the Smoke, and Nidor of them; and therefore the more costly, they thought them the more acceptable, for which Reason, they stuck not sometimes to regale them with human Sacrifices.
    • 1896, Daniel Waterland, A Review of the Doctrine of the Eucharist, page 623:
      Elsewhere to blood, smoke, and nidor, he opposes purity of thought, sincerity of affection, []
    • 1997, Thomas Pynchon, Mason & Dixon:
      The smell, at some times of year sensible for Miles, of Sheep, and wool-fat, and that queasy Nidor of Lambs baking in ovens meant for bread []
  2. (nonstandard) Any smell.
    • 2007, Samuel F. Pickering, Autumn spring, page 28:
      For her part Vicki smells little, not even the nidor of antifreeze at the stock car races at Lake Doucette.
    • 2008, Edgar Wallace, Devil Man, page 9:
      The long, yellow face was framed in side whiskers; there hung about him the nidor of stale cigar smoke.




nīdor m ‎(genitive nīdōris); third declension

  1. the steam or smell from roasting, burning or boiling (especially animals)


Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative nīdor nīdōrēs
genitive nīdōris nīdōrum
dative nīdōrī nīdōribus
accusative nīdōrem nīdōrēs
ablative nīdōre nīdōribus
vocative nīdor nīdōrēs


  • nidor” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.