nudiustertian

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin nudius tertius, from the phrase nunc dies tertius est (“now is the third day”). Coined by Nathaniel Ward (1578–1652) in The Simple Cobler of Aggawam in America (1647).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

nudiustertian ‎(not comparable)

  1. (rare, obsolete) Of or relating to the day before yesterday; very recent.
    • 1647, Theodore de la Guard [pseudonym; Nathaniel Ward], The Simple Cobler of Aggawam in America. Willing to Help 'Mend his Native Country, Lamentably Tattered, both in the Upper-leather and Sole, with all the Honest Stitches he can Take. And as Willing Never to bee Paid for his Work, by Old English Wonted Pay. It is his Trade to Patch all the Year Long, Gratis. Therefore I Pray Gentlemen Keep your Purses, London: Printed by J[ohn] D[ever] & R[obert] I[bbitson] for Stephen Bowtell, at the signe of the Bible in Popes Head-Alley, OCLC 560031272; republished as Project Gutenberg EBook #34974, 15 January 2011:
      [W]hen I heare a nugiperous Gentledame inquire what dresse the Queen is in this week: what the nudiustertian fashion of the Court; I meane the very newest: with egge to be in it in all haste, what ever it be; I look at her as the very gizzard of a trifle, the product of a quarter of a cypher, the epitome of nothing, fitter to be kickt, if shee were of a kickable substance, than either honour'd or humour'd.

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References[edit]

  1. ^ David Mellinkoff (1963) The Language of the Law, Boston, Mass.: Little, Brown and Company, ISBN 978-0-316-56627-8, page 207: “Ward coined nugiperous from Latin nugae (nonsense or foolish), and also nudiustertian from Latin nudius tertius (day before yesterday). Both promptly became obsolete.”

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