palazzo

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See also: Palazzo

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Italian palazzo, from Latin palātium (palace, large residence), from Palātium (Palatine), one of the seven hills of Rome, where aristocrats built large homes. Doublet of palace and Pfalz.

Pronunciation[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Noun[edit]

palazzo (plural palazzos or palazzi)

  1. A large, palatial urban building in Italy.
    • 1831, Letitia Elizabeth Landon, Romance and Reality, volume 2, pages 270-271:
      Cecil Spenser's society—who soon shewed he could understand and enter into his views—became a source of great gratification, and his young countryman was almost domesticated at the palazzo.
    • 1990 May 20, Betty Martin, “A Couple of Ways of Viewing 'the Eternal City'”, in Los Angeles Times[1]:
      At the piazzas, Romans are usually surrounded by tourists attracted by the classical palazzos, churches, monuments and fountains.

Derived terms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin palātium (palace, large residence), from Palātium (Palatine), one of the seven hills of Rome. Cognate to English palace, French palais, Spanish palacio, Portuguese paço, palácio, see more at palātium.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /paˈlat.t͡so/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -attso
  • Hyphenation: pa‧làz‧zo

Noun[edit]

palazzo m (plural palazzi)

  1. a royal palace
    Synonym: reggia
  2. a palatial urban building, a palazzo

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from Italian palazzo, from Latin palātium (palace, large residence), from Palātium (Palatine), one of the seven hills of Rome. Doublet of palacio and pazo.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /paˈlatso/, [paˈla.t̪so]

Noun[edit]

palazzo m (plural palazzos)

  1. palazzo (palatial urban building in Italy)

Usage notes[edit]

According to Royal Spanish Academy (RAE) prescriptions, unadapted foreign words should be written in italics in a text printed in roman type, and vice versa, and in quotation marks in a manuscript text or when italics are not available. In practice, this RAE prescription is not always followed.