setze

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See also: setzè

Catalan[edit]

Catalan cardinal numbers
 <  15 16 17  > 
    Cardinal : setze
    Ordinal : setzè
Catalan Wikipedia article on setze

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan (compare Occitan setze), from Latin sēdecim (sixteen) (compare French seize, Italian sedici).

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

setze m or f

  1. sixteen

Related terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

setze m (plural setzes)

  1. sixteen

Central Franconian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle High German sitzen, from Old High German sizzen, from Proto-West Germanic *sittjan.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

setze (third-person singular present setz or setzt, past tense soß, past participle jesäße or gesess)

  1. to sit
Usage notes[edit]
  • The past participle jesäße is Ripuarian. The form gesess is Moselle Franconian.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle High German setzen, from Old High German sezzen, from Proto-West Germanic *sattjan. Compare German setzen, Dutch zetten, English set.

Alternative forms[edit]

  • sätze (sometimes used in order to distinguish from etymology 1)

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

setze (third-person singular present setz or setzt, past tense satz, past participle jesatz or gesatz or gesat)

  1. to set, to put
Usage notes[edit]
  • The past tense is restricted to Ripuarian, and is rather rare.
  • The past participle jesatz is Ripuarian. The forms gesatz and gesat are Moselle Franconian.

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

setze

  1. inflection of setzen:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative

Hunsrik[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Middle High German setzen, from Old High German sezzen, from Proto-West Germanic *sattjan.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

setze

  1. to set

Further reading[edit]


Occitan[edit]

Occitan cardinal numbers
 <  15 16 17  > 
    Cardinal : setze

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

setze

  1. sixteen

Further reading[edit]


Pennsylvania German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Middle High German setzen, from Old High German sezzen, from Proto-West Germanic *sattjan. Compare German setzen, Dutch zetten, English set.

Verb[edit]

setze

  1. to set
  2. (reflexive) to sit down