seventies

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

seventies

  1. plural of seventy

seventies pl (plural only)

  1. The decade of the 1870s, 1970s, etc.
    • 1914, Amherst College, Amherst Graduates' Quarterly, volume 4, page 6:
      Our readers — and contributors — are apt to elect a good deal according to years. The seventies and eighties, we may suppose, are concerned for the large educational and cultural interests of their Alma Mater; the nineties are deep in the practical and business activities; the noughties are not naughty, but still young enough to sport a fantastic costume at reunion and let the college wag as it will; the oneties are the really wise as to what the college ought to be, especially on its athletic side, but as contributors modest.
    • 2015 February 7, Val Bourne, “The quiet man of the world of snowdrops”, in The Daily Telegraph (London), page G8:
      'The Bride' [a snowdrop variety], found in the early Seventies at Foxcote Farm near Cheltenham, was his first discovery. It's a poculiform (cup-shaped) G. elwesii with six pure white petals of the same length.
  2. The decade of one's life from age 70 through age 79.
  3. (temperature, rates, plural only) The range between 70 and 79.

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Adjective[edit]

seventies (not comparable)

  1. From or evoking the 71st through 80th years of a century (chiefly the 1970s).
    I know the theme of the school dance is "The 1970s" but is covering the walls, floor, and ceiling with tie-dye too seventies?
    • John Covach (2011), “The Hippie Aesthetic: Cultural Positioning and Musical Ambition in Early Progressive Rock”, in Mark Spicer, editor, Rock Music, Routledge, DOI:10.4324/9781315088631-4, →ISBN, page 65: “Among rock critics and journalists, there is an overwhelming bias to view the late sixties in a positive light and seventies music as an unfortunate decline into commercialism at the expense of musical authenticity.”

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