sidus

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Esperanto[edit]

Verb[edit]

sidus

  1. conditional of sidi

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

sidus

  1. Romanization of 𐍃𐌹𐌳𐌿𐍃

Ido[edit]

Verb[edit]

sidus

  1. conditional of sidar

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare Ancient Greek σίδηρος(sídēros). Some derive this from Proto-Indo-European *sweyd-, whence Latin sūdor, Greek ἱδρώς(hidrṓs), English sweat.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sīdus n ‎(genitive sīderis); third declension

  1. constellation, asterism
  2. a star
  3. (poetic) the night sky
  4. (figuratively) a season (of the year)

Inflection[edit]

Third declension neuter.

Case Singular Plural
nominative sīdus sīdera
genitive sīderis sīderum
dative sīderī sīderibus
accusative sīdus sīdera
ablative sīdere sīderibus
vocative sīdus sīdera

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • sidus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • sidus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette, s.v.sidus”.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • a star-light night: nox sideribus illustris
    • the fixed stars: sidera certis locis infixa
    • astronomy: astrologia (pure Latin sidera, caelestia)
    • an astronomer: spectator siderum, rerum caelestium or astrologus
  • sidus in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • sidus in William Smith., editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly