sidus

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Esperanto[edit]

Verb[edit]

sidus

  1. conditional of sidi

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

sidus

  1. Romanization of 𐍃𐌹𐌳𐌿𐍃

Ido[edit]

Verb[edit]

sidus

  1. conditional of sidar

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare Ancient Greek σίδηρος (sídēros). Some derive this from Proto-Indo-European *sweid- (sweat), whence Latin sūdor, Ancient Greek ἱδρώς (hidrṓs), English sweat; however there are phonetic problems, most notably the initial /s/ in Greek instead of expected */h/. The origin of both the Latin and Greek words is unknown, but likely substrate and related to Pre-Greek.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sīdus n (genitive sīderis); third declension

  1. group of stars, constellation, asterism
    • 8 CE, Ovid, Fasti 1.457-458:
      Intereā Delphīn clārum super aequora sīdus tollitur
      Meanwhile the Dolphin, a bright constellation, is being risen over the surface of the sea
  2. a star
    Synonyms: astēr, astrum, stēlla
  3. (poetic) the night sky
  4. (figuratively) a season (of the year)

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun (neuter, imparisyllabic non-i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative sīdus sīdera
Genitive sīderis sīderum
Dative sīderī sīderibus
Accusative sīdus sīdera
Ablative sīdere sīderibus
Vocative sīdus sīdera

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • sidus”, in Charlton T[homas] Lewis; Charles [Lancaster] Short (1879) [] A New Latin Dictionary [], New York, N.Y.; Cincinnati, Ohio; Chicago, Ill.: American Book Company; Oxford: Clarendon Press.
  • sidus”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • sidus in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • a star-light night: nox sideribus illustris
    • the fixed stars: sidera certis locis infixa
    • astronomy: astrologia (pure Latin sidera, caelestia)
    • an astronomer: spectator siderum, rerum caelestium or astrologus
  • sidus”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • sidus”, in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly