stella

From Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Stella, -stella, and -stellä

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin stēlla (a star). Doublet of estoile, étoile, star, and aster.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stella (plural stellae)

  1. (botany) A star-shaped structure.
    • 1939 June, Reed C. Rollins, “Studies in the Genus Lesquerella”, in American Journal of Botany, volume 26, number 6, →DOI:
      Plants of this collection are several decimeters taller; the pedicels are more remote in the inforescence; the stellae are larger and form a less dense cover on plant parts, and the siliques are slightly larger than in the usual form of the species.
    • 1997 July, Maria de Fátima Agra, Michael Nee, “A new species of Solanum subgenus Leptostemonum (Solanaceae) from northeastern Brazil”, in Brittonia, volume 49, number 3, →DOI, page 350:
      Stems and young branches terete, viscid, densely ferruginous-tomentose with sessile to short-stalked pauciradiate stellae bearing greatly prolonged 4-6-celled midpoints, these 0.1-0.2 cm long, gland-tipped, strongly armed with ferruginous laterally compressed prickles, these broad-based and sparsely glandular in the basal quarter.
    • 2008 December, Fang Chen, XiPing Dong, “The internal structure of Early Cambrian fossil embryo Olivooides revealed in the light of synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy”, in Chinese Science Bulletin, volume 53, number 24, →DOI, page 3860:
      The morphological and statistic analyses are also given to the stellae structure of Olivooides and Punctatus, which indicates that this structure is a result of adaptive evolu- tion to a lifestyle of fast-attaching after hatching, probably with the function of mucilage secretion.
  2. (US, numismatics) Alternative letter-case form of Stella.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Corsican[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin stella, from Proto-Italic *stērolā, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂stḗr. Cognates include Italian stella and Romanian stea.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stella f (plural stelle)

  1. star

References[edit]

Interlingua[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin stella, from Proto-Italic *stērolā, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂stḗr.

Noun[edit]

stella (plural stellas)

  1. star

Italian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Italian Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

Wikiquote it

Inherited from Latin stēlla, from Proto-Italic *stērolā, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂stḗr. Doublet of étoile.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (standard) IPA(key): /ˈstel.la/
    • Rhymes: -ella
    • Hyphenation: stél‧la
  • (Milan) IPA(key): /ˈstɛl.la/

Noun[edit]

stella f (plural stelle)

  1. star
    • c. 1226, Francis of Assisi, Cantico delle creature [Canticle of the Creatures]‎[1]; copied, (manuscript), c. mid 13th century, page 2:
      Lauꝺato ſi miſignore ꝑ ſora luna ele ſtelle. in celu lai foꝛmate clarite ⁊ p̄tioſe ⁊ belle. (Umbria)
      [Laudato si' mi' signore per sora luna e le stelle, in cielu l'hai formate clarite e preziose e belle.]
      Praised be you, my Lord, through Sister Moon and the stars; in heaven you have made them clear and precious and beautiful.
    • 1314, Dante Alighieri, “Canto XXXIV”, in Inferno[2], lines 136–139; republished as Giorgio Petrocchi, editor, La Commedia secondo l'antica vulgata[3], 2nd revised edition, Florence: Casa Editrice Le Lettere, 1994:
      salimmo sù, el primo e io secondo,
      tanto ch’i’ vidi de le cose belle
      che porta ’l ciel, per un pertugio tondo.
      E quindi uscimmo a riveder le stelle.
      We climbed up, he first and I second, until I saw the beautiful things that are in the sky through a round hole; then we got out to see the stars again.
    • 1473, Lorenzo de' Medici, Altercazione [Altercation]‎[4], lines 139–141; republished as “De’ beni naturali, cioè corporali” (chapter 3), Altercazione, in Attilio Simioni, compiler, Lorenzo de’ Medici il Magnifico - Opere[5], volume 2, Bari: Laterza, 1913, page 51:
      E come il sol par l’altre stelle cuopra,
      cosí questo splendor lucente e chiaro
      ombra l’inferior, ch’è piú degna opra.
      And just as the sun seems to cover the other stars, so this shining, clear splendour shadows the lesser, being a more worthy task.
    • 1563–1566 [29–19 BCE], “Libro quinto”, in Annibale Caro, transl., Eneide, translation of Aeneis by Publius Vergilius Maro (in Classical Latin), lines 746–748; republished as L’Eneide di Virgilio[6], Florence: G. Barbera, 1892:
      Tal sovente dal ciel divelta cade
      Notturna stella, e trascorrendo lascia
      Dopo sè lungo e luminoso il crine.
      [original: caelō ceu saepe refīxa
      trānscurrunt crīnemque volantia sīdera dūcunt
      ]
      Thus a night star, ripped from the sky, falls, and passes leaving after itself a long, shiny tail.
    • 1790s, Giuseppe Parini, Notte [Night]; collected in Opere dell’abate Giuseppe Parini[7], Venice: Giacomo Storti, 1803, page 167:
      [] Il debil raggio
      De le stelle remote, e de’ pianeti,
      Che nel silenzio camminando vanno
      Rompea gli orrori tuoi sol quanto è duopo
      A sentirli vie più. []
      The faint ray of the faraway stars, and of the planets, which travel through the silence, stopped your horrors just as much as is needed to feel them even more.
    • 1810 [c. 8th century BCE], “Libro XIX”, in Vincenzo Monti, transl., Iliade, translation of Ῑ̓λιάς (Īliás, Iliad) by Homer (in Epic Greek), lines 380–382; republished as Iliade di Omero[8], 4th edition, Milan: Società tipografica dei classici italiani, 1825:
      [] Stella parea
      Su la fronte il grand’elmo irto d’equine
      Chiome, []
      [original: [] ἡ δ’ ἀστὴρ ὣς ἀπέλαμπεν
      ἵππουρις τρυφάλεια []
      ]
      [] hē d’ astḕr hṑs apélampen
      híppouris trupháleia []
      [] The great helmet, fitted with horsehair, looked like a star on the forehead, []
    • 1904, Luigi Pirandello, “Premessa seconda (filosofica) a mo' di scusa [Second (philosophical) introduction, as an apology]” (chapter 2), in Il fu Mattia Pascal [The Late Mattia Pascal]‎[9]; new revised edition, Milan: Fratelli Treves Editori, 1919, page 8:
      Il che vuol dire, in fondo, che noi anche oggi crediamo che la luna non stia per altro nel cielo, che per farci lume di notte, come il sole di giorno, e le stelle per offrirci un magnifico spettacolo.
      Which—all things considered—means that we, to this day, believe that the moon is only in the sky to make light for us at night, like the sun during the day, and the stars to offer us an amazing spectacle.
  2. (heraldry) star, mullet
Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • stella in Collins Italian-English Dictionary
  • stella in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈstel.la/
  • Rhymes: -ella
  • Hyphenation: stél‧la

Verb[edit]

stella

  1. inflection of stellare (to adorn with stars):
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Etymology 3[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈstɛl.la/
  • Rhymes: -ɛlla
  • Hyphenation: stèl‧la

Verb[edit]

stella

  1. inflection of stellare (to shape (the ribs of a ship's hull)):
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Anagrams[edit]

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *stērolā, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂stḗr. Can be considered an assimilated version of *stērla, a diminutive form.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stēlla f (genitive stēllae); first declension

  1. (literal) a star; (poetic) a constellation
    • 43 BCEc. 17 CE, Ovid, Fasti 1.295-296:
      Quis vetat et stēllās, ut quaeque oriturque caditque, dīcere?
      And who forbids me to speak about the stars, how each one rises and sets?
    Synonyms: astēr, astrum, sīdus
    1. a wandering star, a planet
      Synonym: stēlla errāns
    2. a meteor, a shooting star
  2. (transferred sense)
    1. a star shape, a figure of a star
    2. a bright point on a precious stone
    3. a starfish
    4. a glowworm
    5. a pupil of an eye
This entry needs quotations to illustrate usage. If you come across any interesting, durably archived quotes then please add them!

Inflection[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative stēlla stēllae
Genitive stēllae stēllārum
Dative stēllae stēllīs
Accusative stēllam stēllās
Ablative stēllā stēllīs
Vocative stēlla stēllae

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • stella”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • stella”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • stella in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • stella in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[10], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the regular courses of the stars: motus stellarum constantes et rati
    • the planets: stellae errantes, vagae
    • the fixed stars: stellae inerrantes (N. D. 2. 21. 54)

Lombard[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • stèlla (Classical Milanese Orthography)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stella f

  1. star

Further reading[edit]

Neapolitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin stēlla.

Noun[edit]

stella f (plural stelle)

  1. star

Descendants[edit]

Old Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin stella, from Proto-Italic *stērolā, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂stḗr.

Noun[edit]

stella f (oblique plural stellas, nominative singular stella, nominative plural stellas)

  1. star

Descendants[edit]

Sardinian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin stēlla, from Proto-Italic *stērolā, a derivation from Proto-Indo-European *h₂stḗr, derived from the root *h₂eh₁s- (to burn).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stella f (plural stellas)

  1. (Campidanese) star
    Synonyms: steddu, streglia

stella f (plural stelli)

  1. (Gallurese) star
    Synonyms: istella, stedda

Tarantino[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Neapolitan stella, Latin stella, from Proto-Italic *stērolā, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂stḗr.

Noun[edit]

stella

  1. star