stella

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See also: Stella, -stella, and -stellä

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin stēlla (a star). Doublet of estoile, étoile, star, and aster.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈstɛl.ə/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛlə

Noun[edit]

stella (plural stellae)

  1. (botany) A star-shaped structure.
  2. (US, numismatics) Alternative letter-case form of Stella.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • stella”, in Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary

Anagrams[edit]


Corsican[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin stella, from Proto-Italic *stērolā, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂stḗr. Cognates include Italian stella and Romanian stea.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stella f (plural stelle)

  1. star

References[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin stella, from Proto-Italic *stērolā, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂stḗr.

Noun[edit]

stella (plural stellas)

  1. star

Italian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Inherited from Latin stēlla, from Proto-Italic *stērolā, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂stḗr. Doublet of étoile.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (standard) IPA(key): /ˈstel.la/
    • Rhymes: -ella
    • Hyphenation: stél‧la
  • (Milan) IPA(key): /ˈstɛl.la/

Noun[edit]

stella f (plural stelle)

  1. star
    • c. 1226, Francis of Assisi, Cantico delle creature [Canticle of the Creatures]‎[1], page 2:
      Laudato si misignore per sora luna ele stelle, in celu lai formate clarite et pretiose et belle.
      Praised be you, my Lord, through Sister Moon and the stars; in heaven you have made them clear and precious and beautiful.
    • 2004, “I nomi delle stelle”, in Sputi, performed by Marco Paolini e i Mercanti di Liquore:
      I nomi delle stelle son tutti quanti belli / Sirio, Vega, Andromeda, l'Orsa e i Due Gemelli
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
  2. (heraldry) star, mullet
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈstel.la/
  • Rhymes: -ella
  • Hyphenation: stél‧la

Verb[edit]

stella

  1. inflection of stellare (to adorn with stars):
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Etymology 3[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈstɛl.la/
  • Rhymes: -ɛlla
  • Hyphenation: stèl‧la

Verb[edit]

stella

  1. inflection of stellare (to shape (the ribs of a ship's hull)):
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *stērolā, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂stḗr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stēlla f (genitive stēllae); first declension

  1. (literally) a star; (poetic) a constellation
    • 8 CE, Ovid, Fasti 1.295-296:
      Quis vetat et stēllās, ut quaeque oriturque caditque, dīcere?
      And who forbids me to speak about the stars, how each one rises and sets?
    Synonyms: astēr, astrum, sīdus
    1. a wandering star, a planet
      Synonym: stēlla errāns
    2. a meteor, a shooting star
  2. (transferred sense)
    1. a star shape, a figure of a star
    2. a bright point on a precious stone
    3. a starfish
    4. a glowworm
    5. a pupil of an eye
Quote-alpha.png This entry needs quotations to illustrate usage. If you come across any interesting, durably archived quotes then please add them!

Inflection[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative stēlla stēllae
Genitive stēllae stēllārum
Dative stēllae stēllīs
Accusative stēllam stēllās
Ablative stēllā stēllīs
Vocative stēlla stēllae

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • stella”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • stella”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • stella in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • stella in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the regular courses of the stars: motus stellarum constantes et rati
    • the planets: stellae errantes, vagae
    • the fixed stars: stellae inerrantes (N. D. 2. 21. 54)

Lombard[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • stèlla (Classical Milanese Orthography)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stella f

  1. star

Further reading[edit]


Neapolitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin stēlla.

Noun[edit]

stella f (plural stelle)

  1. star

Descendants[edit]


Old Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin stella, from Proto-Italic *stērolā, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂stḗr.

Noun[edit]

stella f (oblique plural stellas, nominative singular stella, nominative plural stellas)

  1. star

Descendants[edit]


Sardinian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin stēlla, from Proto-Italic *stērolā, a derivation from Proto-Indo-European *h₂stḗr, derived from the root *h₂eh₁s- (to burn).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stella f (plural stellas)

  1. (Campidanese) star
    Synonyms: steddu, streglia

stella f (plural stelli)

  1. (Gallurese) star
    Synonyms: istella, stedda

Tarantino[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Neapolitan stella, Latin stella, from Proto-Italic *stērolā, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂stḗr.

Noun[edit]

stella

  1. star