stell

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See also: stëll and Stell

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English stellen, from Old English stellan (to give a place to, set, place), from Proto-West Germanic *stalljan (to put, position), from Proto-Indo-European *stel- (to place, put, post, stand). Cognate with Dutch stellen (to set, put), Low German stellen (to put, place, fix), German stellen (to set, place, provide), Old English steall (position, place). More at stall.

Verb[edit]

stell (third-person singular simple present stells, present participle stelling, simple past and past participle stelled or stold)

  1. (transitive, Britain dialectal, Scotland) To place in position; set up, fix, plant; prop, mount.
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      How he escaped a broken neck in that dreadful place no human being will ever ken. The sweat, he has told me, stood in cold drops upon his forehead; he scarcely was aware of the saddle in which he sat, and his eyes were stelled in his head so that he saw nothing but the sky ayont him.
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To portray; delineate; display.
    • 1594, William Shakespeare, The Rape of Lucrece, 1443–44:
      To this well-painted piece is Lucrece come,
      To find a face where all distress is stelled.
    • 1609, William Shakespeare, Sonnet 24:
      Mine eye hath play'd the painter and hath stell'd
      Thy beauty's form in table of my heart ...

Etymology 2[edit]

Alteration of stall, after the verb to stell.

Noun[edit]

stell (plural stells)

  1. (archaic) A place; station.
  2. A stall; a fold for cattle.
  3. (Scotland) A prop; a support, as for the feet in standing or climbing.
  4. (Scotland) A still.
    • 1786, Robert Burns, "The Author's Earnest Cry And Prayer":
      Paint Scotland greetin owre her thrissle;
      Her mutchkin stowp as toom's a whissle;
      An' damn'd excisemen in a bussle,
      Seizin a stell,
      Triumphant crushin't like a mussel,
      Or limpet shell!
    • 1791, Robert Burns, "Such a Parcel of Rogues in a Nation":
      The English stell we could disdain,
      Secure in valour's station;
      But English gold has been our bane-
      Such a parcel of rogues in a nation!
Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Verb[edit]

stell

  1. singular imperative of stellen

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Danish stel.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stell n (genitive singular stells, nominative plural stell)

  1. service (set of matching dishes or untensils)
  2. set of false teeth
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Back-formation from stella (to potter about, to tinker).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stell n (genitive singular stells, no plural)

  1. pottering, tinkering, idle work
    Synonyms: föndur, bauk, dund, dútl
Declension[edit]

Plautdietsch[edit]

Adjective[edit]

stell

  1. quiet, silent, still
  2. calm, peaceful

Yola[edit]

Noun[edit]

stell

  1. Alternative form of sthill