syllepsis

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Syllepsis

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin syllepsis, from Ancient Greek σύλληψις (súllēpsis).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Examples (rhetoric)
  • She lowered her standards by raising her glass, Her courage, her eyes and his hopes.
    – Flanders and Swann
  • Here thou, great Anna! whom three realms obey, Dost sometimes counsel take—and sometimes tea.
    – Alexander Pope
  • She cribbed the baby and then the corn.
  • She came in high spirits and a Cadillac.

syllepsis (countable and uncountable, plural syllepses)

  1. (rhetoric) A figure of speech in which one word simultaneously modifies two or more other words such that the modification must be understood differently with respect to each modified word; often causing humorous incongruity.
    Coordinate term: zeugma
    Hypernym: brachylogy
  2. (botany) Growth in which lateral branches develop from a lateral meristem, without the formation of a bud or period of dormancy, when the lateral meristem is split from a terminal meristem.
    Antonym: prolepsis

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek σύλληψις (súllēpsis).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

syllēpsis f (genitive syllēpsis or syllēpseōs or syllēpsios); third declension

  1. (grammar) syllepsis

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun (Greek-type, i-stem, i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative syllēpsis syllēpsēs
syllēpseis
Genitive syllēpsis
syllēpseōs
syllēpsios
syllēpsium
Dative syllēpsī syllēpsibus
Accusative syllēpsim
syllēpsin
syllēpsem1
syllēpsēs
syllēpsīs
Ablative syllēpsī
syllēpse1
syllēpsibus
Vocative syllēpsis
syllēpsi
syllēpsēs
syllēpseis

1Found sometimes in Medieval and New Latin.

References[edit]