trenchant

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French, from the present participle of trenchier (to cut).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈtɹɛnʃənt/
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

trenchant (comparative more trenchant, superlative most trenchant)

  1. (obsolete) Fitted to trench or cut; gutting; sharp.
    • 1663, Samuel Butler, Hudibras, part 1, canto 1:
      The trenchant blade, Toledo trusty, / For want of fighting was grown rusty, / And ate into itself, for lack / Of somebody to hew and hack.
  2. (figuratively) Keen; biting; vigorously articulate and effective; severe.
    trenchant wit
    • 1899 February, Joseph Conrad, “The Heart of Darkness”, in Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, volume CLXV, number M, New York, N.Y.: The Leonard Scott Publishing Company, [], OCLC 1042815524, part I, pages 210–211:
      His eyes, of the usual blue, were perhaps remarkably cold, and he certainly could make his glance fall on one as trenchant and heavy as an axe.
    • 2011, Jay A. Gertzman, Bookleggers and Smuthounds: The Trade in Erotica, 1920-1940
      His trenchant criticisms of the Church's repression [] include a discussion of the considerable 1938 success of the fledgling NODL in getting magazines removed from various points of sale.

Translations[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old French trenchant.

Noun[edit]

trenchant m or f (plural trenchans)

  1. sharp

Descendants[edit]

  • French: tranchant

Old French[edit]

Adjective[edit]

trenchant m (oblique and nominative feminine singular trenchant or trenchante)

  1. sharp; razor sharp

Declension[edit]

Verb[edit]

trenchant

  1. present participle of trenchier