veritas

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vēritās.

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): /ˈvɛɹɪtɑːs/

    • (file)

Noun[edit]

veritas (uncountable)

  1. Truth, particularly of a transcendent character.
    • 2007, March 4, “Alexandra Jacobs”, in Campus Exposure[1]:
      Over at Harvard, students are pursuing a different kind of sexual veritas.

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From vērus (true; real, adjective) +‎ -tās (suffix forming an abstract noun).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vēritās f (genitive vēritātis); third declension

  1. truth, truthfulness, verity
    • (Can we date this quote?), Iohannes 8:32
      Vēritās vōs līberābit.
      The truth will set you free.
  2. the true or real nature, reality

Usage notes[edit]

  • Used in the abstract, compare vērum.

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative vēritās vēritātēs
Genitive vēritātis vēritātum
Dative vēritātī vēritātibus
Accusative vēritātem vēritātēs
Ablative vēritāte vēritātibus
Vocative vēritās vēritātēs

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Proverbs with the word “veritas”

Descendants[edit]

Participle[edit]

veritās

  1. accusative feminine plural of veritus

References[edit]

  • veritas in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • veritas in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • veritas in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • veritas in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to turn a deaf ear to, to open one's ears to..: aures claudere, patefacere (e.g. veritati, assentatoribus)
    • to be truthful in all one's statements: omnia ad veritatem dicere
    • truthful; veracious: veritatis amans, diligens, studiosus
    • to swerve from the truth: a veritate deflectere, desciscere
    • (1) to make a lifelike natural representation of a thing (used of the artist); (2) to be lifelike (of a work of art): veritatem imitari (Div. 1. 13. 23)
    • (ambiguous) veracity: veritas
    • (ambiguous) in everything nature defies imitation: in omni re vincit imitationem veritas