victory lap

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English[edit]

Runners at the Women's Marathon during the 2012 Summer Olympics in London: (left to right) Gladys Tejeda (Peru), Rasa Drazdauskaitė (Lithuania), Nastassia Staravoitava (Belarus), Sviatlana Kouhan (Belarus), and Ümmü Kiraz (Turkey)

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Noun[edit]

victory lap (plural victory laps)

  1. (sports) A celebratory extra lap of the race track taken after the conclusion of a race.
  2. (Canada, US, education, slang) One or more years of study beyond the traditional four taken to complete one's undergraduate degree.
    • 2013 February 25, Vivien Chang, “The myth of the four-year degree”, in Maclean's:
      It’s not just finances that lead to victory laps. Those who study abroad during undergraduate may find it difficult to earn enough credits to fulfill degree requirements in four years.
    • 2017 April 1, Peter Lenz, “The Clock Tower: The History, The Myths, and More”, in The Racquet:
      McNaughton continues, “I took a stroll underneath it before freshman year and I am going to be taking a victory lap.”
  3. (Canada, chiefly Ontario, education, slang) One or more additional years of study in high school.
    • 2010 November 18, Patrick Brady; Philip Allingham, “Pathways to University: The ‘Victory Lap’ Phenomenon in Ontario”, in Canadian Journal of Educational Administration and Policy, number 113:
      An examination of the data generated by the survey instrument revealed the existence of a definitive gender disparity between the two groups in that 47.8% (22 of 46) of male respondents reported having taken a victory lap compared to 20.2% (21 of 104) of their female counterparts.
    • 2012 April 9, Teri Pecoskie, “A cap on the victory lap”, in Hamilton Spectator:
      Each year as many as 20,000 students head back for a so-called victory lap in Ontario's classrooms, which prompted the province to implement a 34-credit cap in a bid to save up to $22 million annually.

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