weyven

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Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Anglo-Norman weyver, from waif, from Old Norse veif (flag); equivalent to weif +‎ -en.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈwɛi̯vən/
  • (Northern ME) IPA(key): /ˈwaːvən/

Verb[edit]

weyven

  1. To decide not to engage in or with something; to ignore one's right to do something:
    1. To refuse to perform a task or job or take on a duty.
    2. To waive, renounce or reject something; to give up or go without. (e.g. a cause, a luxury, or a plot of land)
    3. To abscond; to sign out or relieve oneself.
  2. To avoid or to resist engaging in something:
    1. To withstand attack or tempting; to remain unbroken or resistant.
    2. To escape from something; to elude or remain unfindable.
  3. To block; to prevent:
    1. To dismiss; to send away or drive away.
    2. To eliminate, to get rid of or purge.
    3. To deem illegal; to declare someone to be a criminal.
    4. To distract; to stop from entering.
  4. To facilitate the passage of something to someone.
  5. To surrender; to admit or acknowledge defeat.
Conjugation[edit]
Descendants[edit]
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Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse veifa, from Proto-Germanic *waibijaną.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

weyven

  1. To shake, waver or totter; to move to and fro:
    1. To dangle; to sway to and fro while suspended.
    2. To move about; to travel aimlessly or erratically.
    3. (figuratively, rare) To be easily convinced to change course; to be uncertain.
  2. To cause to shake, waver or totter; to push around:
    1. (rare) To open, to lift up.
    2. (figuratively, rare) To make oneself distracted.
Conjugation[edit]
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