absence

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English absence, from Old French absence, ausence, from Latin absentia, from absēns (absent), present active participle of absum (I am away or absent), from ab (from, away from) + sum (I am).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈæb.sn̩s/, /ˈæb.sn̩ts/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

absence (usually uncountable, plural absences)

  1. A state of being away or withdrawn from a place or from companionship; the period of being away. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.][1]
    Absence makes the heart grow fonder.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Phillipians 2:12
      Not as in my presence only, but now much more in my absence.
  2. Failure to be present where one is expected, wanted, or needed; nonattendence; deficiency. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.][1]
    He had an absence of enthusiasm.
    • (Can we date this quote?) - Kent
      In the absence of conventional law.
  3. Lack; deficiency; nonexistence. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.][1]
  4. Inattention to things present; abstraction (of mind). [First attested in the early 18th century.][1]
    absence of mind
  5. (medicine) Temporary loss or disruption of consciousness, with sudden onset and recovery, and common in epilepsy. [First attested in the mid 20th century.][1]
  6. (fencing) Lack of contact between blades.

Antonyms[edit]

The terms below need to be checked and allocated to the definitions (senses) of the headword above. Each term should appear in the sense for which it is appropriate. Use the template {{sense|"gloss"}}, substituting a short version of the definition for "gloss".

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 2003 [1933], Brown, Lesley editor, The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, edition 5th, Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, ISBN 978-0-19-860575-7, page 8:

Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French absence, from Latin absentia, from absēns (absent), present active participle of absum (I am away or absent), from ab (of, by, from) + sum (I am)

Noun[edit]

absence f

  1. absence

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin absentia, from absēns (absent), present active participle of absum (I am away or absent), from ab (of, by, from) + sum (I am).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

absence f (plural absences)

  1. absence (state of being absent or withdrawn).

Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French absent, from Latin absentia, from absēns (absent), present active participle of absum (I am away or absent), from ab (of, by, from) + sum (I am).

Noun[edit]

absence (plural absences)

  1. absent

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • 1954 [First published 1891], Francis Henry Stratmann; Henry Bradley, A Dictionary of Middle English[1], London: Oxford University Press: