addle

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English addlen, from Old English edlēan (reward, pay-back), edlēanian (to reward, recompense); or of North Germanic origin, from Old Norse ǫðlask (to gain possession of property), from ōðal (owndom, property).

Verb[edit]

addle (third-person singular simple present addles, present participle addling, simple past and past participle addled)

  1. (provincial, Northern England) To earn, earn by labor; earn money or one's living. — Forby.
  2. (provincial, Northern England) To thrive or grow; to ripen.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English adel (rotten), from Old English adel, adela (mire, pool, liquid excrement), from Proto-Germanic *adalaz, *adalô (cattle urine, liquid manure). Akin to Scots adill, North Frisian ethel (urine), Saterland Frisian adel "dung", Middle Low German adele "mud, liquid manure" (Dutch aal "puddle"), Old Swedish adel "urine", Bavarian Adel (liquid manure).

Adjective[edit]

addle (comparative more addle, superlative most addle)

  1. Having lost the power of development, and become rotten, as eggs; putrid.
  2. (by extension) Unfruitful or confused, as brains; muddled. John Dryden.
  3. addled
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

addle (plural addles)

  1. (obsolete) Liquid filth; mire.
  2. (provincial) Lees; dregs.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wright to this entry?)

Verb[edit]

addle (third-person singular simple present addles, present participle addling, simple past and past participle addled)

  1. To make addle; to grow addle; to muddle; as, he addled his brain.
    "Their eggs were addled." William Cowper.
  2. To cause fertilised eggs to lose viability, by killing the developing embryo within through shaking, piercing, freezing or oiling, without breaking the shell.
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

addle (plural addles)

  1. A foolish or dull-witted fellow.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.

Anagrams[edit]