antic

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably from Italian antico (ancient, fanciful) (used to describe ancient wall paintings from classical times) from Latin antiquus (venerable)[1]. See also grottesco (grotesque).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

antic (comparative more antic, superlative most antic)

  1. (architecture, art) Grotesque, incongruous.
    • 2004, John Chase, Glitter Stucco and Dumpster Diving: Reflections on Building Production in the Vernacular city, page 58:
      The amusement park environment of seaside resorts such as Venice and the antic eclecticism of Greene & Greene's pre-Craftsman work all preceded the establishment of the movie colony in Hollywood.
  2. Grotesque, bizarre; absurd.
    • 1865, Henry David Thoreau, Cape Cod:
      a fourth would fondly kiss and paw his companions, and sneer in their faces, with a countenance more antic than any in a Dutch droll.
    • 1599-1601, William Shakespeare, Hamlet:
      As I perchance hereafter shall think meet / To put an antic disposition on.
    • 1591-1595, William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet:
      Fetch me my rapier, boy. What dares the slave / Come hither, cover'd with an antic face, To fleer and scorn at our solemnity?
  3. Obsolete form of antique.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

antic (plural antics)

  1. (architecture, art, obsolete) A grotesque representation of a figure; a gargoyle.
  2. A caricature.
  3. (often in plural) A ludicrous gesture or act; ridiculous behaviour.
    • Wordsworth
      And fraught with antics as the Indian bird / That writhes and chatters in her wiry cage.
    • 1953, John Christopher, Blemish
      I saw the barren horror of your people's leisure with the million entertained by the antics of a tiny few []
    • 2007, Jeph Jacques, Time To Add A Cute Kid To The Cast Questionable Content Number 951
      Pintsize: Wait, don’t you want to know why I’m tied up and hanging from the ceiling? / Faye: Not really. Nighty night! / Pintsize: Shit! My wacky antics have jumped the shark!
  4. A grotesque performer or clown.
    • 1978, Walter C. Foreman, The Music of the Close: The Final Scenes of Shakespeare's Tragedies, page 90:
      The Grave-maker, like the professional fools and Falstaff, and like Hamlet himself, is an antic, a grotesque, one who demonstrates to men how foolish and
  5. (animation, from "anticipation") A pose, often exaggerated, in anticipation of an action; for example, a brief squat before jumping

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

antic (third-person singular simple present antics, present participle anticking, simple past and past participle anticked)

  1. (intransitive) To perform antics.
    • 1917, Jack London, Jerry of the Islands, page 54:
      Jerry no more than cocked a contemptuous quizzical eye at the mainsail anticking above him. He knew already the empty windiness of its threats,
  2. (obsolete) To make a fool of, to cause to look ridiculous.
    • c. 1603–1607, William Shakespeare, The Tragedy of Antony and Cleopatra, Act II, Scene VII:
      Gentle lords, let's part; / You see we have burnt our cheeks: strong Enobarb / Is weaker than the wine; and mine own tongue / Splits what it speaks: the wild disguise hath almost / Antick'd us all.
  3. (transitive, rare) To perform (an action) as an antic; to mimic ridiculously.
    • 1931, William Faulkner, Sanctuary, Vintage 1993, page 70:
      She unfastened her dress, her arms arched thin and high, her shadow anticking her movements.
  4. (transitive) To make appear like a buffoon.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Funk, W. J., Word origins and their romantic stories, New York, Wilfred Funk, Inc.

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin antiquus.

Adjective[edit]

antic m (feminine antiga, masculine plural antics, feminine plural antigues)

  1. old

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin antiquus.

Adjective[edit]

antic m (nominative and oblique feminine singular antique)

  1. ancient; very old

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French antique, from Latin antiquus.

Adjective[edit]

antic m

  1. old

Related terms[edit]