archetype

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See also: archétype

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Old French architipe (French archétype), from Latin archetypum, from Ancient Greek ἀρχέτυπον (arkhétupon, pattern, model) neuter of ἀρχέτυπος (arkhétupos, first-moulded), from ἀρχή (arkhḗ, first, origin ) + τύπος (túpos, sort, type, press).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

archetype (plural archetypes)

  1. An original model of which all other similar persons, objects, or concepts are merely derivative, copied, patterned, or emulated; a prototype
  2. (literature) A character, story, or object that is based on a known character, story, or object.
  3. An ideal example of something; a quintessence.
  4. (psychology) According to the Swiss psychologist Carl Jung, a universal pattern of thought, present in an individual's unconscious, inherited from the past collective experience of humanity.

Usage notes[edit]

Traditionally archetype refers to the model upon which something is based, but it has also come to mean an example of a personality archetype, particularly a fictional character in a story based on a well-established personality model. In this fashion, a character based on the Jesus archetype might be referred to as a "Jesus archetype". See eponym for a similar usage conflict.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

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Verb[edit]

archetype (third-person singular simple present archetypes, present participle archetyping, simple past and past participle archetyped)

  1. To depict as, model using or otherwise associate a subject or object with an archetype.
    • 2003 October 31, Clyde Haberman, “NYC; Not Poifect, Dem Movies Of Brooklyn”, New York Times:
      His collaborator was Robert Singer, a professor of English and film studies at Kingsborough Community College, who lamented this week that he and his fellow Brooklynites "have been archetyped to death."

Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

archetype

  1. vocative masculine singular of archetypus