baste

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French bastir (build, construct, sew up (a garment)).

Verb[edit]

Basting material to a pattern before cutting it.

baste (third-person singular simple present bastes, present participle basting, simple past and past participle basted)

  1. To sew with long or loose stitches, as for temporary use, or in preparation for gathering the fabric.
    • 1991 June 14, J.F. Pirro, “Custom Work”, Chicago Reader:
      He bastes the coat together with thick white thread almost like string, using stitches big enough to be ripped out easily later.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Unknown, possibly from Old French basser (moisten, soak).

Verb[edit]

baste (third-person singular simple present bastes, present participle basting, simple past and past participle basted)

  1. To sprinkle flour and salt and drip butter or fat on, as on meat in roasting.
  2. (by extension) To coat over something
    • 2001 April 20, Peter Margasak, “Almost Famous”, Chicago Reader:
      Ice Cold Daydream" bastes the bayou funk of the Meters in swirling psychedelia, while "Sweet Thang," a swampy blues cowritten with his dad, sounds like something from Dr. John's "Night Tripper" phase.
  3. To mark (sheep, etc.) with tar.

Etymology 3[edit]

Perhaps from the cookery sense of baste or from some Scandinavian source. Compare Old Norse beysta (to beat, thresh) (whence Danish børste (to beat up)). Compare also Swedish basa (to beat with a rod, to flog) and Swedish bösta (to thump)

Verb[edit]

baste (third-person singular simple present bastes, present participle basting, simple past and past participle basted)

  1. (obsolete, slang) To beat with a stick; to cudgel.
    • Samuel Pepys
      One man was basted by the keeper for carrying some people over on his back through the waters.
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

baste

  1. singular past indicative and subjunctive of bassen

Anagrams[edit]


Northern Sami[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Noun[edit]

baste

  1. spoon

Inflection[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

baste

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of bastar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of bastar
  3. third-person singular imperative of bastar

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

baste

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of bastar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of bastar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of bastar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of bastar.