bavaroise

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See also: Bavaroise

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

French bavarois, from Bavière (Bavaria)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bavaroise (plural bavaroises)

  1. A drink of sweetened milk, eggs and tea, often with some sort of spirit.
    • 1870 October 22, “Beethoven, Goethe, and Michael Angelo”, in Dwight’s Journal of Music, Volume XXX, Number 16, page 329-330:
      In the A flat andante, flowing like sweet honey, the waiter brings him, instead of coffee, a bavaroise; in the defiant C major Beethoven bellows out for his coffee: the waiter looks anxiously around, and, after a time again brings the bavaroise, but this time milled with “Obers.”
    • 1890, Lafcadio Hearn, Two Years in the French West Indies, Harper & Brothers, page 348:
      Cyrillia always prepares something for me on my return from the beach,—either a little pot of fresh cocoa-water, or a cocoyage, or a mabiyage, or a bavaroise.
    • 1894, Charles Ranhofer, The Epicurean, Kessinger Publishing (2004), ISBN 9780766193833, page 283:
      Bavaroise is taken at night before retiring.
    • 1934, Rafael Sabatini, Venetian Masque, House of Stratus (2001), ISBN 978-07551-156-3-1, page 256:
      He ordered himself a bavaroise and he had begun to sip it when he was aware of a presence at his elbow.
  2. (sometimes proscribed) A cold dessert made from custard, cream and gelatine.
    • 1857 September, “The Code of Honor”, in Harper’s New Monthly Magazine, Volume XV, Number LXXXVIII, page 521:
      Saint Foix had a duel with a gentleman, whom he saw at the Café Procope, eating a bavaroise.
    • 1902, Janet McKenzie Hill, Practical Cooking and Serving, Doubleday, Page & Company, page 519:
      Pistachio-and-Strawberry Bavaroise
    • a. 1914, Lida Seely, Mrs. Seely’s Cook Book, The Macmillan Company (1914), page 308:
      A chocolate bavaroise may be made the same as above, adding two ounces of chocolate dissolved in a little water just before the mixture is strained.
    • 2005, Joanne Harris and Fran Warde, The French Market: More Recipes from a French Kitchen, HarperCollins (2006), ISBN 978-0-06-089313-2, page 196:
      There are any number of variants on the classic bavaroise, the most elegant of chilled puddings.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  • “bavarois” in Alan Davidson and Tom Jaine, The Oxford Companion to Food, Second Edition, Oxford University Press (2006), ISBN 978-0-19-280681-9, page 65.

Finnish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɑʋɑruɑːs/

Noun[edit]

bavaroise

  1. bavaroise (drink)
  2. bavarois, also bavaroise (dessert)

Declension[edit]

This word does not fit smoothly into the Finnish inflection schemes. Therefore it may be advisable to use a synonym or a pronoun in inflected forms.

Usage notes[edit]

  • For the dessert bavarois is regarded as more correct spelling.

Synonyms[edit]

Hypernyms[edit]


French[edit]

Adjective[edit]

bavaroise

  1. feminine form of bavarois