broach

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See also: broaçh

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Old French broche, from Vulgar Latin *brocca, originally feminine form of Latin broccus, perhaps ultimately of Gaulish origin (see Gaelic brog; cognate to brochure.[1]

Noun[edit]

broach (plural broaches)

  1. A series of chisel points mounted on one piece of steel.
  2. (masonry) A broad chisel for stone-cutting.
  3. Alternative spelling of brooch.
  4. A spit for cooking food.
    • Francis Bacon
      He turned a broach that had worn a crown.
  5. An awl; a bodkin; also, a wooden rod or pin, sharpened at each end, used by thatchers.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Forby to this entry?)
  6. (architecture, UK, dialect) A spire rising from a tower.
  7. A spit-like start on the head of a young stag.
  8. The stick from which candle wicks are suspended for dipping.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  9. The pin in a lock which enters the barrel of the key.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

broach (third-person singular simple present broaches, present participle broaching, simple past and past participle broached)

  1. (transitive) To make a hole in, especially a cask of liquor, and put in a tap in order to draw the liquid.
  2. (transitive) To open, to make an opening into; to pierce.
    French knights at Agincourt were unable to broach the English line.
  3. (transitive, figuratively) To begin discussion about (something).
    I broached the subject of contraceptives carefully when the teenager mentioned his promiscuity.
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

This definition is lacking an etymology or has an incomplete etymology. You can help Wiktionary by giving it a proper etymology.

Verb[edit]

broach (third-person singular simple present broaches, present participle broaching, simple past and past participle broached)

  1. (intransitive) To be turned sideways to oncoming waves, especially large or breaking waves.
    The small boat broached and nearly sank, because of the large waves.
  2. (transitive) To cause to turn sideways to oncoming waves, especially large or breaking waves.
  3. (transitive) To be overcome or submerged by a wave or surge of water.
    Each time we came around into the wind, the sea broached our bow.
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ broach” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

broach (plural broachs)

  1. (archaic) A spindle.
  2. (archaic) A slender or thin person (especially as a nickname).